Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson, born March 6, 1916 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma was a film and television actress whose career spanned four decades from the 1930s through the 1960s. She was named a WAMPAS Baby Star in 1931 along with future Hollywood stars Joan Blondell, Constance Cummings, Frances Dee, and Anita Louise. Hudson may be best remembered today for costarring in “Wild Boys of the Road” (1933), playing Cosette in “Les Miserables” (1935), as the older sister of Shirley Temple’s character in “Curly Top” (1935), and for playing Natalie Wood’s mother in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955). Other notable roles for Hudson include; Sally Glynn the fallen ingenue in “She Done Him Wrong” (1933) starring Cary Grant and Mae West; Richard Cromwell’s love interest in the Will Rogers showcase “Life Begins at Forty” (1935); “Way Down East” (1935) with Henry Fonda; the daughter of carnival barker W.C. Fields in “Poppy” (1936); and Claudette Colbert’s adult daughter in “Imitation of Life” (1934).

 

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson


 

In the 1954–1955 television season, Hudson co-starred with Gil Stratton and Eddie Mayehoff in the CBS situation comedy “That’s My Boy”, based on the 1951 Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin film of the same name. Other television credits include appearing on Racket Squad in 1951, Schlitz Playhouse in 1952, Shower of Stars in 1954, Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre in 1955, and Branded in 1965.

 

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in "Way Down East" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in
“Way Down East” (1935)


 

Hudson was married four times. Her first husband was Charles Brust. Little is known of the marriage other than it ended in divorce. She remarried in 1939 to Harold Thompson, who was the head of the Storyline Department at Disney Studios. She assisted Thompson, who was doing espionage work in Mexico as a civilian during World War II. They posed as a vacationing couple to various parts of Mexico, to detect if there was any German activity in these areas. One of their more successful vacations uncovered a supply of high test aviation gas hidden by German agents in Baja California. After their divorce in 1947, Hudson married a third time the following year to Los Angeles Times sportswriter, Dick Irving Hyland. The marriage lasted two years before the couple divorced. Her final marriage was to Robert Mindell, a hotel executive. The couple remained together for eight years before they divorced in 1971.

 

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in "Imitation of Life" (1934)

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in
“Imitation of Life” (1934)


 

On January 17, 1972, Hudson was found dead in her home at the Palm Desert Country Club. A business associate with whom she had been working in real estate discovered her body on her bathroom floor. Hudson had died of a heart attack brought on by a liver ailment. Her only close survivor was her mother.

 

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in "Poppy" (1936)

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in
“Poppy” (1936)

 

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in "Curly Top" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in
“Curly Top” (1935)

 

Rochelle Hudson - Bathing Beauty -  ca.1940s

Rochelle Hudson

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              Debbie Reynolds wishing everyone a
                    Happy Valentine’s Day (1950)

Debbie Reynolds wishing everyone a happy Valentine's Day, 1950.

Debbie Reynolds wishing everyone a
Happy Valentine’s Day, 1950.

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Gloria Talbott was a popular actress during the 1950’s and 60’s with over a hundred film and television credits during her career.

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott was born February 7, 1931 in Glendale in Los Angeles County, California, a city co-founded by one of her grandfathers. Her sister, Lori Talbott, also became an actress. Talbott began her career as a child actress in such films as “Maytime” (1937) , “Sweet and Low-down” (1944) and “A Tree Grows In Brooklyn” (1945). After leaving school, Talbott formed a dramatic group and played “arena”-style shows at various clubs. After a three-year hiatus from acting (1948-50) due to marriage, motherhood and a divorce, she resumed her career, working regularly in both television and films. Talbott appeared films such as “Desert Pursuit” (1952), “Crashout” (1955), the Humphrey Bogart comedy “We’re No Angels” (1955), “Lucy Gallant” (1955), and “All That Heaven Allows” (1955). Some of her other movies include “The Oklahoman” (1957) with Joel McCrae and Barbara Hale, “Cattle Empire” (1958), and “The Oregon Trail” (1959) with Fred MacMurray. Talbott also became known as a ‘scream queen’ in the late 1950’s after appearing in a number of horror films including “The Daughter of Dr. Jekyll” (1957), “The Cyclops” (1957), “I Married a Monster from Outer Space” (1958) and “The Leech Woman” (1960). Her final film role was as Bri Quince in the 1966 Western film “An Eye for an Eye”.

 

Gloria Talbott, Fred MacMurray, and unknown in "The Oregon Trail" (1959)

Gloria Talbott, Fred MacMurray, and unknown in
“The Oregon Trail” (1959)

 

During the 1950’s and 60’s Talbott also worked extensively in television. Some of her many television credits include appearances in shows and television movies such as “Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok” (1951), “Hopalong Cassidy” (1953), “TV Reader’s Digest” episode ‘America’s First Great Lady’ as Pocahontas (1955), “Fireside Theatre” (four episodes in 1953 and 54), “Adventures of Superman” (1956), “Zane Grey Theater” (1956), three episodes in “The Restless Gun” (1958), “Zorro” (four episodes in 1959), “Wanted: Dead or Alive” (three episodes 1958-1960), “Rawhide” (three episodes 1959-1961), “The Untouchables” (1962), “Laramie” (four episodes 1960-1963), “Gunsmoke” (three episodes 1955-1963), “Lassie” (1965), and Perry Mason (four episodes 1961-1966).

 

Gloria Talbott withTom Tryon in "I Married a Monster From Outer Space" (1958)

Gloria Talbott withTom Tryon in
“I Married a Monster From Outer Space” (1958)

 

Gloria Talbott was married four times. Her first marriage was to KUSC broadcaster Gene Stanley Parrish on February 19, 1949. They divorced in 1953. Her second marriage was to Sandy Sanders in June 1956. They divorced nine years later in 1965. Her third marriage was to Dr. Steven J. Capabianco in January 1967. They divorced in 1969 after only two years of marriage. Talbott’s fourth and last marriage was to Patrick Mullally on April 27, 1970. The couple remained married until her death in September of 2000.
Talbott had a son, Mark, by her first husband Gene Parrish and a daughter, Mea, with Dr. Steven J. Capabianco, her third husband. Her daughter Mea won three gold medals in local ice skating competitions while she grew up is now an aspiring actress. Mae would rename herself Mea M. Mullally, taking the last name of man who raised her, Talbott’s fourth husband Patrick Mullally.

 

Gloria Talbott with Robert Stack in a 1962 episode of the television series "The Untouchables" (1962)

Gloria Talbott with Robert Stack in a 1962 episode of
the television series “The Untouchables” (1962)

 

Gloria Talbott died from kidney failure September 19, 2000 (aged 69) in Glendale, California. She is interred in the Mausoleum at San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills, Los Angeles County, California.

 

Gloria Talbott in "The Oklahoman" (1957)

Gloria Talbott in “The Oklahoman” (1957)

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

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When asked by gossip columnist Earl Wilson if she had ever been mistaken for a man on the phone (due to her deep husky voice), Tallulah Bankhead replied, “No, have you?”
 

Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“I read Shakespeare and the Bible, and I can shoot dice. That’s what I call a liberal education.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“The only thing I regret about my past is the length of it. If I had to live my life again, I’d make the same mistakes, only sooner.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“It’s the good girls who keep diaries, the bad girls never have the time.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“My father warned me about men and booze, but he never mentioned a word about women and cocaine.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“I’m the foe of moderation, the champion of excess. If I may lift a line from a die-hard whose identity is lost in the shuffle, I’d rather be strongly wrong than weakly right.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead with Gary Cooper in "Devil and the Deep" (1932)

Tallulah Bankhead with Gary Cooper in
“Devil and the Deep” (1932)


 
“Say anything about me, dahling, as long as it isn’t boring.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead with Robert Montgomery in "Faithless" (1932)

Tallulah Bankhead with Robert Montgomery in “Faithless” (1932)


 
“Nobody can be exactly like me. Even I have trouble doing it.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 

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Anne Cornwall was an American actress who performed for forty years in many silent film productions starting in 1918 and later in talkies until 1959.

 

Anne Cornwall (January 17, 1897 – March 2, 1980)

Anne Cornwall
(January 17, 1897 – March 2, 1980)

Cornwall was born in Brooklyn, New York on January 17, 1897. She made her film debut in 1918 with a bit role in the silent film “The Knife” and was one of the thirteen Wampas Baby Stars of 1925. The brunette actress went on to appear in fifty seven films during her career, alternating between dramatic performances (most often in westerns) and with turns as baby-faced, wide-eyed leading ladies in comedies. Her best remembered roles were opposite Buster Keaton in “College” (1927) and as one of the two flappers in Laurel & Hardy’s two-reeler “Men O’War” (1929). After 1930 most of her roles were minor and often uncredited. Cornwall briefly reappeared before the public eye in 1957, when she made the personal-appearance rounds with her old co-star Buster Keaton on the occasion of the Paramount biopic “The Buster Keaton Story” (1957).

 

Anne Cornwall performed for forty years in many silent film productions starting in 1918

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall was married twice. First to writer/director Charles Maigne, then later to Los Angeles engineer Ellis Wing Taylor, who fathered her only child, Peter Taylor.

 

Anne Cornwall

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall died on March 2, 1980 in Van Nuys, California, USA.

 

Anne Cornwall

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall with Buster Keaton in “College” (1927)

Anne Cornwall with Buster Keaton
in “College” (1927)

 

Anne Cornwall (second from left) with Gloria Greer, Oliver Hardy and Stan Laurel in Men O' War (1929)

Anne Cornwall (second from left) with Gloria Greer, Oliver Hardy and Stan Laurel in Men O’ War (1929)

 

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