Margaret Brooke Sullavan (May 16, 1909 – January 1, 1960) was an American stage and film actress who preferred working on the stage, making only sixteen movies during her Hollywood career.

 

Margaret Sullavan

Margaret Sullavan

Margaret Sullavan was born May 16, 1909 in Norfolk, Virginia to Cornelius Sullavan, a wealthy stockbroker, and his wife, Garland Brooke. Sullavan attended boarding school at Chatham Episcopal Institute (now Chatham Hall), where she was president of the student body and delivered the salutary oration in 1927. Sullavan moved to Boston and lived with her half-sister, Weedie, where she studied dance at the Boston Denishawn studio and (against her parents’ wishes) drama at the Copley Theatre. When her parents cut her allowance to a minimum, she defiantly paid her way as a clerk in the Harvard Cooperative Bookstore (The Coop), located in Harvard Square, Cambridge. Sullavan began her acting career onstage in early 1929 in a Harvard Dramatic Society musical production entitled Close Up. In the summer of 1929 she made her debut on the professional stage appearing opposite Henry Fonda in The Devil in the Cheese. Sullavan made her debut on Broadway in A Modern Virgin (a comedy by Elmer Harris), on May 20, 1931. After appearing in several Broadway productions Sullavan replaced another actor in Dinner at Eight in March of 1933. Movie director John M. Stahl happened to be watching the play and decided Sullavan would be perfect for a picture he was planning, “Only Yesterday” (1933). Sullavan had already turned down offers from Paramount and Columbia for five-year contracts, but when Stahl offered her a three-year, two-pictures-a-year contract with MGM at $1,200 a week, she accepted it and had a clause put in her contract that allowed her to return to the stage on occasion. Sullavan would continue to only sign short-term contracts because she did not want to be “owned” by any studio. After making “Only Yesterday” Sullavan would go on to make only sixteen movies during her Hollywood acting career, four of which were opposite James Stewart including the popular classic “The Shop Around the Corner” (1940) and “Three Comrades” (1938) for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance. Sullavan’s other movies of note include the profitable and successful WWII drama “Cry Havoc” in 1943 and “Back Street” (1941) which was lauded as one of the best performances of Sullavan’s Hollywood career. Sullavan retired from the screen after making “Cry Havoc”, but returned in 1950 to make her last movie, “No Sad Songs for Me” (1950), in which she plays a woman who is dying of cancer. For the rest of her career Margaret Sullavan would only appear on the stage appearing in several shows on Broadway and in London, England.

 

Margaret Sullavan

Margaret Sullavan


 

When I really learn to act, I may take what I have learned back to Hollywood and display it on the screen”, Sullavan once said in an interview in October 1936, “but as long as the flesh-and-blood theatre will have me, it is to the flesh-and-blood theatre I’ll belong. I really am stage-struck. And if that be treason, Hollywood will have to make the most of it”

 

Margaret Sullavan

Margaret Sullavan


 

Margaret Sullavan was married four times. Her first marriage was to Henry Fonda on December 25, 1931 in Baltimore, while both were performing with the University Players in its 18-week winter season there. The marriage lasted only two months and the couple divorced.
In late 1934, Sullavan married William Wyler, the director of her next movie, “The Good Fairy” (1935). This second marriage lasted just over a year and they divorced in March 1936.
Sullavan’s third husband was agent and producer Leland Hayward. Hayward had been Sullavan’s agent since 1931 and their relationship had been deepening all through 1936. The couple had already become lovers, and Brooke, their “love child”, had been conceived that October. They both wanted the baby and married on November 15, 1936. Sullavan and Hayward would have three children together; Brooke in 1937, Bridget in 1939, and Bill in 1941. The marriage lasted eleven years and ended in 1947 when Sullavan discovered that Hayward was cheating on her with New York socialite and fashion icon Slim Keith.
Her fourth and final marriage was to English investment banker Kenneth Wagg. The couple stayed married until her death in 1960.

 

Margaret Sullavan with Walter Pidgeon and James Stewart in "The Shopworn Angel" (1938)

Margaret Sullavan with Walter Pidgeon and James Stewart in
“The Shopworn Angel” (1938)


 

In her later life Margaret Sullavan experienced increasing hearing and health problems, depression, and mental frailty in the 1950s. She died of an overdose of barbiturates, which was ruled accidental, on January 1, 1960 at the age of 50. On January 1, 1960, Sullavan was found in bed, barely alive and unconscious, in a hotel room in New Haven, Connecticut. She was rushed to the hospital but died shortly after arrival. No note was found to indicate suicide, and no conclusion was reached as to whether her death was the result of a deliberate or an accidental overdose. The county coroner officially ruled Sullavan’s death an accident. After a private memorial service was held in Greenwich, Connecticut, Margaret Sullavan was interred at Saint Mary’s Whitechapel Episcopal Churchyard in Lancaster, Virginia.

 

Margaret Sullavan with Franchot Tone, Robert Taylor, and Robert Young from "Three Comrades" (1938)

Margaret Sullavan with Franchot Tone, Robert Taylor, and
Robert Young from “Three Comrades” (1938)


 

For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Margaret Sullavan has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame located at 1751 Vine Street. She was inducted, posthumously, into the American Theatre Hall of Fame in 1981.

 

Margaret Sullavan with James Stewart in "The Mortal Storm" (1940)

Margaret Sullavan with James Stewart in “The Mortal Storm” (1940)

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Lynn Baggett (May 10, 1923 – March 22, 1960) was a little known ill-fated actress who had roles in twenty-four movies during her brief ten year Hollywood career.

 

Lynn Baggett

Lynn Baggett


 

Lynn Baggett was born on May 10, 1923 in Wichita Falls, Texas, USA. Baggett was discovered by a top Warner Brothers talent scout on her way to a department store in July 1942 and subsequently signed to a three-year contract. After her Warner Brothers contract was up, Baggett moved to Universal in late 1946. Baggett appeared in twenty-four movies during her brief ten year Hollywood career (1941-1951), including roles in “D.O.A.” (1950), “The Flame and the Arrow” (1950) and “The Time of Their Lives” (1946). Baggett never reached stardom and her last movie role was in “The Mob” in 1951.

 

Lynn Baggett

Lynn Baggett


 

Lynn Baggett is probably most well known for her marriage to “On The Waterfront” producer, Sam Spiegel, who was twenty years her senior. The couple married on April 10, 1948 but separated after only four years and finally divorced on March 31, 1955.

 

Lynn Baggett

Lynn Baggett


 

In July of 1954 Lynn Baggett was charged in the hit-and-run death of a nine year old boy. The car she was driving had been loaned to her by actor George Tobias (Mr. Kravits from “Bewitched”). After the accident she fled the scene but turned herself in three days later. In December that same year, Baggett was sentenced to sixty days in county jail and placed on three years probation.

 

Lynn Baggett

Lynn Baggett


 

Following the tragic accident and her bitter divorce from Spiegel the following spring, her life quickly spiraled downward. Baggett attempted suicide by overdosing on sleeping pills in June 1959. Later that year she was found suffering from paralysis due to drug addiction and diagnosed as a ‘chronic depressed neurotic’. Baggett was then admitted for short time as a patient in a sanitarium for observation and then released. On March 22, 1960 Lynn Baggett was found dead in her apartment from an apparent overdose of barbiturates in Hollywood, California at the age of 36.

 
Lynn Baggett Dies, Pills At Her Side -- news article from LA Times about Lynne Baggett's death March 22, 1960.
 

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On the set of
“There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

“There’s No Business Like Show Business” is a 1954 20th Century-Fox musical-comedy-drama starring Ethel Merman, Dan Dailey, Donald O’Connor, Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Richard Eastham, and Johnnie Ray. The film was directed by Walter Lang and written by Lamar Trotti (story) and Phoebe Ephron and Henry Ephron with music by Irving Berlin. “There’s No Business Like Show Business” was filmed in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color.

 

Director Walter Lang and Mitzi Gaynor on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Director Walter Lang and Mitzi Gaynor on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Irving Berlin visits with Marilyn Monroe on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Irving Berlin visits with Marilyn Monroe on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Ethel Merman visits with Ceasar Romero on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Ethel Merman visits with Ceasar Romero on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Johnnie Ray and director Walter Lang on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Johnnie Ray and director Walter Lang on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe and Donald O’Connor on the set of "There’s No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe and Donald O’Connor on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Ethel Merman and Dan Dailey relax on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Ethel Merman and Dan Dailey relax on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Johnnie Ray, Mitzi Gaynor, Dan Dailey, Ethel Merman, Donald O´Connor and Marilyn Monroe preparing for the big number on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Johnnie Ray, Mitzi Gaynor, Dan Dailey, Ethel Merman, Donald O´Connor and Marilyn Monroe preparing for the big number on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe gets hair and make-up touch ups on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe gets hair and make-up touch ups on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe  on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe relaxes between scenes on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe relaxes between scenes on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe outside her trailer during the filming of "There’s No Business Like Show Business"  (1954)

Marilyn Monroe outside her trailer during the filming of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe wardrobe fitting and photo for "There’s No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe wardrobe fitting and photo for “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Donald O'Connor and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Donald O’Connor and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

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Eleanore Whitney was a film and Broadway actress and dancer who had a brief career in Hollywood during the mid to late 1930s.

 

Eleanor Whitney

Eleanor Whitney

Eleanore Whitney was born Eleanor Wittenbergon on April 12, 1917 in Cleveland, Ohio, USA to Abraham and Anna Wittenburg. Eleanore’s mother Anna was the sister of Adolph Zukor, who was already a wealthy businessman and would later become the founder of Paramount and a powerful figure in old Hollywood. When Whitney was ten years old she met Bill ‘Bojangles’ Robinson backstage at the Palace Theatre in Cleveland. Robinson was so taken by Whitney’s dancing that he took to giving her lessons whenever he was in the city. Later he offered to teach her each day during a two month stay in New York and was instrumental in the start of her career. As a student of Robinson’s, Whitney landed roles in several Broadway productions. Whitney also appeared in vaudeville with Jack Benny and Rudy Vallee before going to Hollywood in 1935. During her brief career in Hollywood, Whitney appeared in several comedies and musicals for Paramount Studios such as “Rose Bowl” (1936), “Three Cheers for Love” (1936), “Timothy’s Quest” (1936), and “Campus Confessions” (1938) which co-starred Betty Grable in her first starring role. Never having reached A-status as an actress with Paramount, the then twenty-one year old Eleanore Whitney retired from Hollywood in 1939 after marrying former U.S. assistant Attorney Frederick Backer. They couple lived in Manhattan and had one daughter together, Nancy Anne Backer, born in 1941. Whitney would continue to dance for fun, sometimes giving dancing lessons, and in 1946 would play Lucille Jourdain in “The Would-be Gentleman” on Broadway. Whitney and Backer would remain married until his death in 1971. Whitney did not remarry after the death of her husband and lived the rest of her life in New York City. Eleanore Whitney died November, 1983 in New York City, New York.

Eleanor Whitney (1936 portrait)

Eleanor Whitney (1936 portrait)

 

Eleanor Whitney

Eleanor Whitney

 

Eleanor Whitney

Eleanor Whitney

 

Eleanor Whitney relaxing in the sun (1937)

Eleanor Whitney relaxing in the sun (1937)

 

Eleanore Whitney with Johnny Downs on the set of "College  Holiday" (1936)

Eleanore Whitney with Johnny Downs on the set of “College Holiday” (1936)

 

Eleanor Whitney (right) with Betty Grable and Buster Crabbe in "Thrill of a Lifetime" (1936)

Eleanor Whitney (right) with Betty Grable and Buster Crabbe in “Thrill of a Lifetime” (1936)

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Nancy Kelly (March 25, 1921 – January 2, 1995) was an American actress who was a Hollywood leading lady in the late 1930s and 1940s, making thirty-six movies total between 1926 and 1977. Kelly was also the older sister of actor Jack Kelly, who played “Bart Maverick” alongside James Garner and Roger Moore in the 1957 television series Maverick.

 

Nancy Kelly (March 25, 1921 – January 2, 1995)

Nancy Kelly
(March 25, 1921 – January 2, 1995)

Nancy Kelly was born March 25, 1921 in Lowell, Massachusetts. Kelly started in show business as a one-year-old model for James Montgomery Flagg. By the time she was nine years old, Kelly had appeared in so many different advertisements that Film Daily called her “the most photographed child in America due to commercial posing.” In 1929, as an eight year old, she appeared on Broadway in a revival of “Macbeth”. Kelly also played Dorothy Gale in a 1933 to 1934 radio show based on the The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Kelly’s film debut was in the 1926 silent film “The Untamed Lady” which starred Gloria Swanson. In 1929, Kelly had a small role in the silent version of “The Great Gatsby” which starred Warner Baxter and William Powell. As an adult Kelly was a leading lady in twenty-seven movies in the 1930s and 1940s, including portraying Tyrone Power’s love interest in the classic “Jesse James” (1939) which also featured Henry Fonda and playing opposite Spencer Tracy in “Stanley and Livingstone” (1939). Other movies of note Kelly starred in include director John Ford’s “Submarine Patrol” (1938), “Tail Spin” (1939) with Alice Faye, the comedy “He Married His Wife” (1940) with Joel McCrea, “Frontier Marshal” (1939) with Randolph Scott as Wyatt Earp, and “Tarzan’s Desert Mystery” (1943) with Johnny Weismuller. In between films Kelly worked the stage and was subsequently a two-time winner of the Sarah Siddons Award for her work in Chicago theatre as well as a Tony Award winner for her performance in “The Bad Seed”, a 1954 play by American playwright Maxwell Anderson. In 1956, Kelly followed up by starring in the film version of “The Bad Seed” for which she received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in a Leading Role, but lost to Ingrid Bergman’s “Anastasia” (1956).

 

Nancy Kelly in "The Bad Seed" (1956) Kelly was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her role in the film.

Nancy Kelly in “The Bad Seed” (1956) Kelly was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her role in the film.

 

After “The Bad Seed” Nancy Kelly appeared almost exclusively on television. In 1957 she was nominated for an Emmy Award for Best Single Performance by an Actress for the TV episode “The Pilot” (1956) in Studio One. Kelly’s other television appearances include leading roles in “Circle of the Day” (1957) episode of Playhouse 90, “The Storm” (1961) episode of Thriller and “The Lonely Hours” (1963) episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. Her last role was in the 1977 made for television film “Murder at the World Series” (1977).

 

Nancy Kelly -- a Hollywood leading lady in the 1930s and 1940s

Nancy Kelly — a Hollywood leading lady in the
1930s and 1940s

 

Nancy Kelly was married three times. Her first marriage was to actor Edmond O’Brien in February 1941. They were divorced one year later in February 1942. Kelly’s second marriage was to Fred Jackman Jr., the son of silent Hollywood cameraman and director Fred Jackman. They were married February 14, 1946 and divorced in January of 1950. Her third marriage was to theatre director Warren Caro on November 25, 1955. The couple had a daughter together, Kelly Caro in 1957. That marriage also ended in divorce in September of 1968.

 

Nancy Kelly with Tyrone Power in the classic "Jesse James" (1939)

Nancy Kelly with Tyrone Power in the classic
“Jesse James” (1939)

 

Nancy Kelly died from complications of diabetes on January 2, 1995 in Bel Air, California. She was interred in the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles.

 

Nancy Kelly with Johnny Weissmuller in "Tarzan's Desert Mystery" (1943)

Nancy Kelly with Johnny Weissmuller in
“Tarzan’s Desert Mystery” (1943)

 

For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Nancy Kelly has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Blvd.

 

Nancy Kelly with Joel McCrea in "He Married His Wife" (1940)

Nancy Kelly with Joel McCrea in “He Married His Wife” (1940)

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