Archive for June, 2011

“Joan Of Arc” – Ingrid Bergman

 

All I have done, I have done by the command of my Lord… that is, all I have done well.” ~ Joan of Arc (Ingrid Bergman)

 

Joan Of Arc (1948)


 

“Joan Of Arc” is a 1948 technicolor film directed by Victor Fleming and starring Ingrid Bergman as the young French Heroine. The story is set in the Fifteenth Century, France is a defeated and a ruined nation after the One Hundred Years War against England. Fourteen year old farm girl Joan of Arc claims to hear voices from Heaven asking her to lead God’s Army against the English and the crowning of the weak Dauphin Charles VII as King of France. Joan gathers the people with her faith, forms an army, and conquerors Orleans. When her army is ready to attack Paris the corrupt Charles sells his country to England and dismisses the army. Joan is arrested, sold to the English,  and submitted to a shameful political trial in Rouen castle, eventually being burned at the stake for heresay.

 

Ingrid Bergman – “Joan Of Arc” (1948)

 

“Joan Of Arc” was nominated for seven Academy Awards, becoming the first film to receive seven nominations without receiving a Best Picture nomination. Ingrid Bergman recieved a Best Actress nomination and Jose Ferrer recieved a Best Supporting Actor nomination. Although Bergman and Ferrer did not win, the movie did win two Academy Awards for Best Costume Design and Best Cinematography. Walter Wanger also recieved a Honorary Academy Award “for distinguished service to the industry in adding to its moral stature in the world community by his production of the picture Joan of Arc.” Wanger refused his honorary Oscar for the film because he was angry that the film had not been nominated for Best Picture.

 

Ingrid Bergman – “Joan Of Arc” (1948)

 

Ingrid Bergman – “Joan Of Arc” (1948)

 

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Judy Garland – A Pictorial

 

“If I am a legend, then why am I so lonely?” ~ Judy Garland

 

Judy Garland


 

“Hollywood is a strange place if you’re in trouble. Everybody thinks it’s contagious.” ~ Judy Garland

 

Judy Garland – Wizard of Oz – 1939


 

“I was born at the age of 12 on a Metro Goldwyn Mayer lot.” ~ Judy Garland

 

Judy Garland


 

“MGM had us working days and nights on end. They’d give us pep-up pills to keep us on our feet long after we were exhausted. Then they’d take us to the studio hospital and knock us cold with sleeping pills… Then after four hours they’d wake us up and give us the pep-up pills again so we could work another seventy-two hours in a row.” – Judy Garland

 

Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland


 

“I think she decided to go into show business when she was an embryo, she kicked so much.” ~ Judy Garland on daughter Liza Minelli

 

Judy Garland and Daughter Liza Minelli – 1946


 

“In the silence of night I have often wished for just a few words of love from one man, rather than the applause of thousands of people.” ~ Judy Garland

 

Judy Garland and Fred Astaire – Easter Parade – 1948


 

“Be a first rate version of yourself, not a second rate version of someone else.” ~ Judy Garland

 

Judy Garland before a concert at the Greek Theater – 1957

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Maria Montez – “The Queen Of Technicolor”

 

“When I look at myself, I am so beautiful I scream with joy!”
~ Maria Montez after viewing herself in Arabian Nights (1942).

 

Maria Montez

María Montez, born Maria Africa Antonia Gracia Vidal de Santo Silas on June 6, 1912 in Barahona, Dominican Republic, was a motion picture actress who gained fame and popularity in the 1940s as an exotic beauty starring in a series of filmed-in-Technicolor costume adventure films. Her screen image was that of a hot-blooded Latin seductress, dressed in fanciful costumes and sparkling jewels. She became so identified with these adventure epics that she became known as “The Queen of Technicolor.” She was also nicknamed “The Caribbean Cyclone”. Over her career, Montez appeared in 26 films, 21 of which were made in North America and five in Europe. Montez’s beauty made her the centerpiece of Universal’s Technicolor costume adventures, notably the six in which she was teamed with Jon Hall; “Arabian Nights” (1942), “White Savage” (1943), “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” (1944), “Cobra Woman” (1944), “Gypsy Wildcat” (1944), and “Sudan” (1945).  She also appeared in the Technicolor western “Pirates of Monterey” (1947) with Rod Cameron and the sepia-toned swashbuckler “The Exile” (1948), starring opposite Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.

Maria Montez

While working in Hollywood, she met and married French actor Jean-Pierre Aumont, who had to leave a few days after their wedding to serve in the Free French Forces fighting against Nazi Germany in the European Theatre of World War II. At the end of World War II, the couple had a daughter, Maria Christina (also known as Tina Aumont), born in Hollywood in 1946. They then moved to a home in Suresnes, Île-de-France in the western suburb of Paris under the French Fourth Republic. There, Montez appeared in several films and a play written by her husband. She also wrote three books, two of which were published, as well as penning a number of poems.

Maria Montez

Maria Montez died in Suresnes, France on September 7, 1951 at the age of 39, after apparently suffering a heart attack and drowning in her bath. She was buried in the Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris where her tombstone displays her theatrical year of birth, 1918.

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Paulette Goddard a major film star of the 1930s and 40s

 

I lived in Hollywood long enough to learn to play tennis and become a star, but I never felt it was my home.” ~ Paulette Goddard

 

Paulette Goddard was an American film and theatre actress. A former child fashion model, she appeared in several Broadway productions as a Ziegfeld Girl, and she became a major star of the Paramount Studio in the 1940s. She was married to several notable men, including Charlie Chaplin, Burgess Meredith, and Erich Maria Remarque.

 

Paulette Goddard


 

Goddard was born Marion Pauline Levy on June 3, 1910 in Whitestone Landing, Queens, Long Island. She was the only child of Joseph Russell Levy and Alta Mae Goddard. Her parents divorced while she was young, and she was raised by her mother. Her father virtually vanished from her life, only to resurface later in the late 1930s after she became a star. At first, their newfound relationship seemed genial and they attended film premières together, but later he sued her over a magazine article in which she purportedly claimed he abandoned her when she was young. They were never to reconcile. She remained very close to her mother, however, as both had struggled through those early years, with her great uncle, Charles Goddard (her grandfather’s brother) lending a hand. Charles Goddard helped his great niece find jobs as a fashion model, and with the Ziegfeld Follies as one of the heavily decorated Ziegfeld Girls from 1924 to 1927. Her stage debut was in the Ziegfeld revue “No Foolin” in 1926. The next year she made her stage acting debut in “The Unconquerable Male”. She also changed her first name to Paulette and took her mother’s maiden name (which also happened to be her favorite great uncle Charles’ last name) as her own last name.

 

Paulette Goddard


 

In 1927 she married Edgar James, an older, wealthy businessman, lumber tycoon and moved to North Carolina. They divorced and Goddard returned to Hollywood in 1929. Upon her return to Hollywood, with her mother, Goddard appeared in small roles in “The Girl Habit” (1931) and “The Mouthpiece” (1932). She signed a contract with Hal Roach Studios, and appeared in films such as “The Kid from Spain” (1932) and Laurel and Hardy’s “Pack Up Your Troubles” (1932). Goddard then appeared in a few films for Samuel Goldwyn Productions. Along with such actresses as Betty Grable, Lucille Ball, and Ann Sothern, Goddard became a “Goldwyn Girl” and was featured in films such as “Roman Scandals” (1933) and “Kid Millions” (1934).

 

Paulette Goddard and Charlie Chaplin

 

In 1932, she met Charlie Chaplin and he bought out her contract from Roach. She lived with Chaplin in his Beverly Hills home. Their marital status was a source of controversy and speculation. During most of their time together, both refused to comment on the matter. Chaplin maintained that they were married in China in 1936, but to private associates and family, he claimed they were never legally married, except in common law. Chaplin and Goddard starred together in “Modern Times” (1936) which was a great success.

 

Paulette Goddard, Charlie Chaplin, and Henry Bergman – “Modern Times” (1936)

 

After the success of “Modern Times” Goddard signed a contract with David O. Selznick and appeared with Janet Gaynor in the comedy “The Young in Heart” (1938) before Selznick loaned her to MGM to appear in two films. The second of these, “The Women” (1939), was a huge success. With an all-female cast headed by Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, and Rosalind Russell, Goddard played the supporting role of Miriam Aarons. Selznick was so impressed with Goddard’s work that he considered her for the role of Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone With The Wind” and gave her a screen test. The O’Hara role came down to Goddard and Vivien Leigh, but Leigh was chosen.

 

Paulette Goddard


 

After losing the role of Scarlett O’Hara Goddard signed a contract with Paramount Pictures and her next film was “The Cat and the Canary” (1939) starring opposite Bob Hope and she then starred as Fred Astaire’s leading lady in the musical “Second Chorus” (1940), where she met Burgess Meredith. She starred again with Chaplin in his 1940 film “The Great Dictator”. The couple split amicably soon afterward, and Goddard allegedly obtained a divorce in Mexico in 1942, with Chaplin agreeing to a generous settlement.

 

Paulette Goddard – “Kitty” (1945)


 

One of Goddard’s best-remembered film appearances was in the variety musical “Star Spangled Rhythm” (1943) in which she sang a comic number, “A Sweater, a Sarong, and a Peekaboo Bang”, with fellow sex symbols Dorothy Lamour and Veronica Lake. She received a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination  for her performance in “So Proudly We Hail” (1943). She next starred in what was her most successful film “Kitty” (1945), in which she played the title role. She then appeared in “In The Diary of a Chambermaid” (1946), starring opposite her then husband Burgess Meredith (they had married in 1944). Cecil B. DeMille next cast her in three blockbusters: “Northwest Mounted Police” (1940), “Reap the Wild Wind” (1942), and “Unconquered” (1947). For whatever reason, Goddard’s career then began to fade in the late 40’s and Paramount dropped her in 1949. She had roles in a few more movies but never again regained the star status she enjoyed earlier in her career.

 

Paulette Goddard and Gary Cooper – “Unconquered” (1947)


 

Goddard and Burgess Meredith divorced in 1949. In 1958 she married Erich Maria Remarque, author of, among other best-sellers, “All Quiet on the Western Front”. They remained married until his death in 1970, and she inherited much of his money and several important properties across Europe including a wealth of contemporary art, which augmented her own long-standing collection. During this period, her talent at accumulating wealth became a byword amongst the old Hollywood elite. During the 1980s she became a fairly well known and highly visible socialite in New York City society, appearing, covered with jewels, at many high-profile cultural functions with several well-known men including Andy Warhol, with whom she sustained a friendship with for many years until his unexpected death in 1987.

 

Paulette Goddard


 

Paulette Goddard died April 23, 1990 in Ronco sopra Ascona, Switzerland after a short illness (reportedly emphysema) several months before her 80th birthday. She is buried in Ronco cemetery, next to her late husband Erich Maria Remarque and her mother Alta Mae.

 

Paulette Goddard – WWII pin-up

 

You live in the present and you eliminate things that don’t matter. You don’t carry the burden of the past. I’m not impressed by the past very much. The past bores me, to tell you the truth; it really bores me. I don’t remember many movies and certainly not my own.” ~ Paulette Goddard

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Joan Caulfield

 
Joan Caulfield was a movie and Broadway actress and former fashion model. Hailed in her time as one of the screen’s great beauties, many of her cameramen said she was one of the few women in Hollywood whom it was virtually impossible to photograph badly.
 

Joan Caulfield (June 1, 1922 - June 18, 1991)

Joan Caulfield
(June 1, 1922 – June 18, 1991)

Joan Caulfield was born June 1, 1922 in East Orange, New Jersey. She moved to West Orange during childhood but continued attending Miss Beard’s School in Orange, New Jersey. During her teenage years, the family moved to New York City where Joan eventually attended Columbia University. She was discovered by Broadway producers which started a successful career on stage. This led to a contract with Paramont Pictures. Her first role was in “Miss Susie Slagle’s” (1946) which also starred Veronica Lake, Sonny Tufts, Billy DeWolfe, and Lillian Gish. Her next movie was opposite Bob Hope in “Monsieur Beaucaire” (1946) and then she played the love interest of Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire in “Blue Skies” (1946). She was lent out to Warner Bros. and starred in what was probably her most memorable role in the film-noir classic “The Unsuspected” (1947)  with Claude Rains, Audrey Totter, and Constance Bennett.

 

Joan Caulfield – Sept. 1941 cover of McCall Magazine

 

Joan Caulfield starred in eleven movies from 1946-1951 before turning to television. She appeared on programs such as “Cheyenne”, “Baretta”, and “Murder, She Wrote”, with Angela Lansbury. In the 1957-1958 season, Caulfield starred in her own short-lived NBC situation comedy, “Sally” in the role of a traveling companion to an elderly widow, played by Marion Lorne.

 

Joan Caulfield

 

In 1950, Joan Caulfield married the film producer Frank Ross, with whom she had a son Caulfield Kevin Ross. The couple divorced in 1960. Caulfield later married Robert Peterson, a dentist, with whom she had her second son John Caulfield Peterson. This marriage ended in divorce as well. At the time of her death, she had one grandchild

 

Joan Caulfield

 

Joan Caulfield died in Los Angelas, California at the age 69 from lung cancer. Her ashes were scattered in the Pacific Ocean.

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