Archive for August, 2011

June Collyer was a popular film actress of the 1920s and 1930s

 
June Collyer was a popular film actress of the 1920s and 1930s.
 

June Collyer

June Collyer, born Dorothea Heermance in New York City, New York on August 19, 1906 was an American film actress of the 1920s and 1930s. Collyer chose to use her mother’s maiden name when she decided to pursue acting. A society girl chosen by Allan Dwan, she had her first starring role in 1927 when she starred in “East Side, West Side”. She did a total of eleven films during the silent film era, and unlike many of that period she made a successful transition to sound movies. In 1928 she was one of thirteen girls selected as “WAMPAS Baby Stars”. In 1930 Collyer starred opposite Louise Dresser and Joyce Compton in “The Three Sisters”, and that same year she starred with Claudia Dell in “Sweet Kitty Bellairs”. She starred in nineteen films from 1930 to 1936. Collyer took a break from acting for the period of the 1940s, either by choice or due to her not receiving starring roles. During the 1950s she returned to acting, having a regular role on the television series “The Stu Erwin Show” (aka “Trouble With Father”) from 1950 through 1955, starring with her husband, Stu Erwin. She played in one episode of the 1958 series “Playhouse 90”, then retired.

 

June Collyer


 

Collyer was the sister of radio and television personality Bud Collyer, and her sister-in-law was actress Marian Shockley. She was married to actor Stu Erwin from 1931 until his death in December 1967,  just a few months before her own death. She remained in Los Angeles, dying at the age of 61 on March 16, 1968, of bronchial pneumonia. She was interred at Chapel of the Pines Crematory.

 

June Collyer with husband Stuart Erwin and son.


 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Mae West – A Pictorial

 

“I freely chose the kind of life I led because I was convinced that a woman has as much right as a man to live the way she does if she does no actual harm to society.” ~ Mae West

 

Mae West

 

“My advice to those who think they have to take off their clothes to be a star is, once you’re boned, what’s left to create the illusion? Let ’em wonder. I never believed in givin’ them too much of me.” ~ Mae West

 

Mae West

 

“It isn’t what I do, but how I do it. It isn’t what I say, but how I say it, and how I look when I do it and say it.”  ~ Mae West

 

Mae West

 

“I believe in censorship. After all, I made a fortune out of it.” ~ Mae West

 

Mae West

 

“When caught between two evils I generally pick the one I’ve never tried before.” ~ Mae West

 

Mae West

 

“It ain’t sin if you crack a few laws now and then, just so long as you don’t break any.” ~ Mae West

 

Mae West

 

“Men are my life, diamonds are my career!” ~ Mae West

 

Mae West 1933

 

“Marriage is a great institution, but I’m not ready for an institution.” ~ Mae West

 

Mae West 1935

 

“I wrote the story myself. It’s about a girl who lost her reputation and never missed it.” ~ Mae West

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Stage Door: Ginger Rogers and Katharine Hepburn

Jean Maitland (Ginger Rogers): “We started off on the wrong foot. Let’s stay that way.”
.

"Stage Door" (1937 - RKO) theatrical poster

 

 

“Stage Door” (1937 – RKO), adapted from the play by the same name, tells the story of several would-be actresses who live together in a boarding house at 158 West 58th Street in New York City. The film stars Ginger Rogers, Katharine Hepburn, Adolphe Menjou, Gail Patrick, Constance Collier, Andrea Leeds, Samuel S. Hinds and Lucille Ball. Eve Arden and Ann Miller (who become famous in later films) play minor characters. The film was adapted by Morrie Ryskind and Anthony Veiller from the play by Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman. The play’s storyline and the characters’ names were almost totally completely changed for the movie, so much so in fact that Kaufman joked the film should be called “Screen Door”.

 

 

 

 

 

Katharine Hepburn and Ginger Rogers in “Stage Door” (1937)

 

“Stage Door” follows a boardinghouse full of aspiring actresses and their ambitions, dreams and disappointments. Terry Randall (Katharine Hepburn), is an aspiring actress from a wealthy Midwestern family, and a new-comer at the Footlights Club, a modest New York boardinghouse, where she is greeted by a bevy of world-weary actresses and chorus girls. Terry’s haughty manner and highbrow tastes immediately alienate her from her fellow “troopers” who pride themselves on their sharp wit and down-to-earth style. Jean Maitland (Ginger Rogers), Terry’s roommate, is a wise-cracking dancer who resents Terry’s lavish wardrobe and judgmental attitudes. Because of her dubious liaison with theatrical producer Anthony “Tony” Powell (Adolphe Menjou), a notorious womanizer, Jean also dislikes another housemate, the sophisticated Linda Shaw (Gail Patrick). Loved by all of the women, however, is Kay Hamilton (Andrea Leeds), a high-strung  dedicated actress who, although receiving rave notices for a play that she had starred in the previous year, has since been unable to find work.  Miss Luther (Constance Collier) is an aging actress who is Terry’s only supporter and who appoints herself Terry’s mentor. Cynical Judith (Lucille Ball), feisty Eve (Eve Arden), and a young lively Annie (Ann Miller) round out the boardinghouse residents.

 

Ginger Rogers and Katharine Hepburn – “Stage Door” (1937)

 

Other characters include Samuel S. Hinds as Hepburn’s father, Jack Carson as a Seattle lumberman, Grady Sutton as a butcher’s helper, Frank Reicher as a stage director, Franklin Pangborn as as a hiloarious butler, and Ralph Forbes in the role of Hepburn’s stage spouse.

 

Andrea Leeds, Constance Collier, and Katharine Hepburn – “Stage Door” (1937)

 

The entire cast is excellent and the movie is fast paced with snappy dialogue and lively banter. Sharp and humorous, with heart and heartbreaking tragedy, “Stage Door” is a must see for all classic movie fans.

 

Ginger Rogers, Adolphe Menjou, and Katharine Hepburn – “Stage Door” (1937)

 

Stage Door was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture and Leeds was nominated for an Academy Award as Best Supporting Actress.

.

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Louise Brooks at home 1925

The silent film beauty Louise Brooks (Lulu) at home in 1925.

 

Louise Brooks at home 1925 - staircase

Louise Brooks at home 1925 – staircase


 
Louise Brooks 1925 at home in the entrance to her garden

Louise Brooks 1925 at home in the entrance to her garden


 
Louise Brooks - 1925 striking a pose at home in her garden

Louise Brooks – 1925 striking a pose at home in her garden


 
Louise Brooks - 1925 at home in her garden

Louise Brooks – 1925 at home in her garden


 
Louise Brooks relaxing in her garden - 1925

Louise Brooks relaxing in her garden – 1925

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Martha Hyer

Martha Hyer (August 10, 1924 – May 31, 2014) was an American actress best remembered for her role as Gwen French in “Some Came Running” (1958), for which she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Martha Hyer - Publicity shot for "Sabrina" (1954)

Martha Hyer – Publicity shot for “Sabrina” (1954)

Martha Hyer was born on August 10, 1924 in Fort Worth, Texas. She attended Northwestern University where she majored in drama and speech and was a member of Pi Beta Phi fraternity. Once she finished her formal schooling, Hyer landed an uncredited bit role in 1946’s “The Locket” which starred Loraine Day and Robert Mitchum. Gradually Hyer began picking up roles with more and more substance, eventually landing roles in movies such  as “So Big” (1953), “Sabrina” (1954) with Humphrey Bogart, Audrey Hepburn and William Holden, “The Delicate Delinquent” in 1956 which was Jerry Lewis’ first film without Dean Martin, “Houseboat” (1958) with Cary Grant and Sophia Loren, “Ice Palace” (1960), “Desire in the Dust” (1960), “The Carpetbaggers” (1964), and “The Sons of Katie Elder” (1965). Her most significant role came as the love interest of Frank Sinatra in “Some Came Running” for director Vincente Minnelli in 1958, for which Hyer received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Hyer was also one of the actresses considered for the role of the doomed Marion Crane in the Alfred Hitchcock thriller “Psycho” which went to Janet Leigh. Her last film was “Day of the Wolves” in 1973.

 

Martha Hyer

Martha Hyer

 

Martha Hyer also appeared on several television programs such as “Rawhide”, “The Deputy”, “Playhouse 90”, “The Lone Ranger”, “Adventures of Wild Bill Hitchcock”, and “Fireside Theatre” among others. All told, Hyers appeared in over 100 movies and television programs during a career that spanned three decades.

 

Martha Hyer

Martha Hyer

 

Hyer married producer Hal B. Wallis in 1966, and the couple remained together until his death in 1986.
Martha Hyer enjoyed a quiet retirement through the 1980s and 1990s. She died on May 31, 2014, at the age of 89 from natural causes, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she had lived for many years.
Her autobiography, ‘Finding My Way: A Hollywood Memoir’, was published in 1990.

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr