Archive for November, 2011

Katharine Hepburn: My Top Five

 

Throughout her 66-year career, Katharine Hepburn appeared in 44 feature films, eight television movies and 33 plays. In a career that spanned 62 years as a leading lady, Hepburn was best known for playing strong-willed, sophisticated women in both dramas and comedies. She is the winner of a record four Academy Awards for Best Actress and her twelve total Academy Award nominations are surpassed by only Meryl Streep. Katharine Hepburn was named by the American Film Institute as the greatest female star in the history of American cinema.

 

Picking your favorite Katharine Hepburn movies is like choosing between gems of equal value and brilliance. Just about any of her movies could make a top five list. The following are my top five Katharine Hepburn movies that I enjoyed the most in no particular order.  (This is my list today, by tomorrow it may change…..)

 

"Stage Door" (1937 - RKO) - Ginger Rogers and Katharine Hepburn

 

"The Philadelphia Story" (1940 - MGM) - John Howard, Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, James Stewart.

 

"Woman Of The Year" (1942 - MGM) - Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy

 

"Adam's Rib" (1949 - MGM) - Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn

 

"The African Queen" (1952 - United Artists) - Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn

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Beach Beauties: Betty Grable

 

Betty Grable enjoying a day at the beach.

 

Betty Grable - 1940 (photo by Peter Stackpole for LIFE)

 

Betty Grable - 1940 (photo by Peter Stackpole for LIFE)

 

Betty Grable - 1940 (photo by Peter Stackpole for LIFE)

 

Betty Grable - 1940 (photo by Peter Stackpole for LIFE)

 

Betty Grable - 1940 (photo by Peter Stackpole for LIFE)

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Genevieve Tobin

 

Genevieve Tobin

Genevieve Tobin was an American actress born on November 29, 1899 in New York City, New York. The daughter of a vaudeville performer, Tobin made her film debut in 1910 in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” as Eva. She appeared in a few films as child, and formed a double act with her sister Vivian. Their brother, George, also had a brief acting career. Following her education in Paris and New York, Tobin concentrated on a stage career in New York. Although she was seen most often in comedies, she also played the role of Cordelia in a Broadway production of “King Lear” in 1923. Popular with audiences, she was often praised by critics for her appearance and style rather than for her talent, however in 1929 she achieved a significant success in the play “Fifty Million Frenchmen”. She introduced and popularized the Cole Porter song “You Do Something to Me”.

Genevieve Tobin

The success of her role in “Fifty Million Frenchmen” resulted in her going back to Hollywood, where she performed regularly in films throughout the 1930s. Tobin primarily played prominent supporting roles in movies such as “One Hour with You” (1932) with Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald; “Goodbye Again” (1933) co-starring Warren William and Joan Blondell; “Kiss and Make Up” (1934) with Cary Grant and Helen Mack; and “The Goose and the Gander” (1935) with Kay Francis and George Brent. She occasionally played starring roles, in films such as “Golden Harvest” (1933) and “Easy to Love” (1934). She played secretary Della Street to Warren William’s Perry Mason in “The Case of the Lucky Legs” (1935). One of her most successful performances was as a bored housewife in the drama “The Petrified Forest” (1936) opposite Leslie Howard, Bette Davis, and Humphrey Bogart.

Cary Grant, Genevieve Tobin, and Edward Everett Horton in "Kiss And Make-Up" (1934)

Tobin married director William Keighley in 1938 and retired from film in 1940 after her last movie “No Time for Comedy” with James Stewart and Rosalind Russell. Tobin and Keighy remained married until his death in 1984.
Genevieve Tobin died July 21, 1995, aged 95, in Pasadena, California,  of natural causes.

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Esther Williams – Happy Thanksgiving!!

 

“America’s Mermaid”, Esther Williams
wishing everyone a Happy Thanksgiving!!

 

Esther Williams – Happy Thanksgiving!!
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Corinne Griffith

 

Corinne Griffith was an American silent film actress who was one of the most popular film actresses of the 1920’s. Dubbed “The Orchid Lady of the Screen”, Griffith was widely considered the most beautiful actress of the silent screen. Shortly after the advent of sound film, Griffith retired from acting and became a successful businesswoman and author.

 

Corinne Griffith

Corinne Mae Griffith was born on November 21, 1894 in Texarkana, Texas to John Lewis Griffin and Ambolina Ghio. She attended Sacred Heart Convent school in New Orleans and worked as a dancer before she began her acting career. Griffith began her screen career at the Vitagraph Studios in 1916. She later moved to First National, where she became one of their most popular stars. The silent movie “Black Oxen” (1924) was one of her most popular films. In 1925 she made the film “DeClasse” in which a young extra named Clark Gable appeared. In 1928, she had the starring role in “The Garden of Eden”. The next year, in 1929, Griffith received an Academy Award nomination for her role in “The Divine Lady”. Griffith’s first sound film, “Lilies of the Field”, was released in 1930. Her voice did not record well and the film was a box office flop. After appearing in one more motion picture, the British film “Lily Christine” in 1932, she retired from acting. In her only theatre work Griffith starred in a touring production of Noel Coward’s “Design for Living” in the mid 1930’s. She returned to the screen in 1962 in the low-budget melodrama “Paradise Alley”.

Corinne Griffith

Griffith was one of the few film stars to move successfully into new careers once her stardom had ended. An astute businesswoman after leaving her film career behind, she soon amassed a fortune in real estate holdings. At one point she owned four different major office buildings in Los Angeles, each of them named after her. At the time of her death in 1979, she was one of the wealthiest women in the world, leaving an estate of $150 million. Griffith was also an accomplished writer who published eleven books including two best sellers, “My Life with The Redskins” and the memoir “Papa’s Delicate Condition”, which was made into a 1963 film starring Jackie Gleason.

Corinne Griffith

Corinne Griffith was married four times. She married actor and frequent co-star Webster Campbell from 1920 to 1923 and was married to producer Walter Morosco from 1924 to 1934. Her third marriage was to the owner of the Washington Redskins football team George Preston Marshall from 1936 to 1958. During her marriage to Marshall, she composed the lyrics to the Redskins fight song “Hail to the Redskins” which became one of the most famous football anthems.
In 1966 she married her fourth husband, Broadway actor Danny Scholl. Scholl was forty-five, more than twenty-five years Griffith’s junior. They were only married for a few days when Griffith filed for an annulment. In court she testified that she was not Corinne Griffith. She claimed that she was the actresses’ younger (by twenty years) sister who had taken her place upon the famous sister’s death. Contradicting testimony by actresses Betty Blythe and Claire Windsor, who had both known her since the 1920s, did not shake her story. She was granted the annulment thirty-three days after the marriage.

Corinne Griffith

Corinne Griffith died of heart failure at the age of eighty-four on July 13, 1979, in Santa Monica, California.
For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Corrine Griffith has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1560 Vine Street.

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