Archive for December, 2011

Janet Chandler

 

Janet Chandler was a little known American Actress who had roles in several movies in the early 1930’s.

 

Janet Chandler

Janet Chandler was born Lillian Elizabeth Guenther on December 31, 1911 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. When Janet was a child the family moved to Los Angeles where she attended Harter School for Girls and Orton School for Girls (Years later, in 1952, she would earn a bachelor’s degree in English from UCLA). As a child actress, Chandler had an uncredited role in the Douglas Fairbanks movie “The Three Musketeers” (1921) and three years later had another uncredited role in “Inez of Hollywood” (1924). During her teen years she became a model and that lead to a brief Warner Brotherss contract. The sultry blonde eventually signed with Fox and was cast opposite George O’Brien in “The Golden West” (1932). Some of her later credits included “Cowboy Holiday” (1932), “House of Danger” (1934), “Cyclone of the Saddle” (1935) and “Now or Never” (1935). Chandler retired from acting in 1936 after a serious accident on a film set.

Janet Chandler

Janet Chandler married George Edward Barrett, an investment banker from New York, on October 21, 1935. They had three daughters together; Janet, Sarah and Adriane. The marriage ended in divorce.
On January 11, 1956 Chandler married Joseph A. Kramm. The marriage lasted four months as they divorced on April 4, 1956.

Janet Chandler as a child

Janet Chandler died of heart failure after suffering a stroke on March 16, 1994 at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, California.

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Anna Karenina (1935)

 

“Anna Karenina” (1935 – MGM) is the most famous and critically acclaimed film adaptation of the classic novel Anna Karenina written by Leo Tolstoy. The film is directed by Clarence Brown and stars Greta Garbo, Fredric March, Basil Rathbone, Freddie Bartholomew, Maureen O’Sullivan, May Robson, and Reginald Owen.

 

“Anna Karenina” (1935 – MGM) U.S. Theatrical Poster

“Anna Karenina” is set mostly in Moscow during the weeks that follow the initial meeting of the lovers to be Vronsky and Anna Karenina. Anna Karenina (Greta Garbo) is the wife of Czarist official Karenin (Basil Rathbone). While she tries to persuade her brother Stiva (Reginald Owen) from a life of debauchery, she meets and falls in love with dashing military officer Count Vronsky (Fredric March). This indiscreet liaison ruins her marriage and her position in 19th century Russian society. She is even prohibited from seeing her own son Sergei (Freddie Bartholomew). The story, as it unfolds, also focuses on Kitty (Maureen O’Sullivan), a young woman who is related to Anna’s sister-in-law. Until Anna shows up, Kitty had hopes of getting Vronsky, who is single and well connected, to propose to her. Soon she is ignored by Vronsky and turns her attention to another suitor.

 

Greta Garbo in “Anna Karenina” (1935)


 

“Anna Karenina” is like many of the typical high-budget MGM films, the direction is excellent, the sets are big and well done, and the music is wonderful. The cast as a whole give great, impressive performances. Basil Rathbone’s portrayal as the cold and unforgiving Karenin is superb and almost equals that of Garbo’s. Freddie Bartholomew was eleven years old when the film was made and he is very memorable in his role as Anna Karenina’s son Sergei, especially in the scenes he has with Garbo. Fredric March’s portrayal of Vronsky was not his best performance but he was still very good. Maureen O’Sullivan, May Robson, and Reginald Owen were also very good in their supporting roles. But the heart of “Anna Karenina” was Greta Garbo. She is unforgettable as a woman helpless in the situation she finds herself in and heartbroken at the loss of her son.

 

Greta Garbo with Fredric March in “Anna Karenina” (1935)


 

“Anna Karenina” opened August 30, 1935 in New York City at the Capitol Theatre, the site of many prestigious MGM premieres and earned $2,304,000 at the box office. The film won the Mussolini Cup for best foreign film at the Venice Film Festival. Greta Garbo received a New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress for her role as Anna. The film was ranked #42 on the American Film Institute’s list of AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Passions.

 

Basil Rathbone, Greta Garbo, and Freddie Bartholomew in “Anna Karenina” (1935)


 

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Marlene Dietrich – A Pictorial

 

“I had no desire to be a film actress, to always play somebody else, to be beautiful with somebody constantly straightening out your every eyelash. It was always a big bother to me.” ~ Marlene Dietrich

 

Marlene Dietrich

 

“I’m not an actress, I’m a personality.” ~ Marlene Dietrich

 

Marlene Dietrich

 

“Glamour is what I sell, it’s my stock in trade.” ~ Marlene Dietrich

 

Marlene Dietrich

 

“The relationship between the make-up man and the film actor is that of accomplices in crime.” ~ Marlene Dietrich

 

Marlene Dietrich

 

“Careful grooming may take twenty years off a woman`s age, but you can’t fool a flight of stairs.” ~ Marlene Dietrich

 

Marlene Dietrich

 

“I never ever took my career seriously.” ~ Marlene Dietrich

 

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Merry Christmas from Mary Martin

 

Santas beautiful helper Mary Martin and Classic Cinema Gold
wishing everyone a safe and joyful

 

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!

 

Mary Martin c.1940
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Irene Dunne

 
“I took my work seriously. Everything I did had a purpose. It wasn’t just a superficial acting job for the moment. It was tremendously important to me…” ~ Irene Dunn
 

Irene Dunne

Irene Dunne (December 20, 1898 – September 4, 1990) was an American film actress and singer of the 1930s, 1940s and early 1950s. Dunne has been described as the best actress never to win an Academy Award. She was nominated five times for the Academy Award for Best Actress, for her performances in “Cimarron” (1931-RKO), “Theodora Goes Wild” (1936-Columbia), “The Awful Truth” (1937-Columbia), “Love Affair” (1939-RKO) and “I Remember Mama” (1948-RKO). She was named to the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame in 1958. In 1985, she was awarded the Kennedy Center Honors, Lifetime Achievement for a career that spanned three decades and a range of musical theater, the silver screen, Broadway, radio and television. Other honors include the Laetare Medal from Notre Dame University in 1949, the Bellarmine Medal from Bellarmine College in 1965 and Colorado’s Women of Achievement in 1968. She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6440 Hollywood Blvd. and displays in the Warner Bros. Museum and Center for Motion Picture Study.
Irene Dunne died peacefully at her Holmby Hills home in Los Angeles, California in 1990, and is entombed in the Calvary Cemetery in East Los Angeles, California. Her personal papers are housed at the University of Southern California.

 

The following are stills from her five Academy Award nominations.

 

Irene Dunne and Richard Dix in "Cimarron" (1931)

 

Irene Dunne and Melvyn Douglas in "Theodora Goes Wild" (1936)

 

Irene Dunne and Cary Grant in "The Awful Truth" (1937)

 

Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer in "Love Affair" (1939)

 

Irene Dunne in "I Remember Mamma" (1948)

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