Archive for April, 2012

Corinne Calvet

 

Corinne Calvet was a statuesque seductive French actress who appeared mostly in American films from the late 1940’s to the early 80’s.

 

Corinne Calvet

Calvet was born Corinne Dibos April 30, 1925 in Paris, France. She studied criminal law at the Sorbonne and made her debut in French radio, stage plays and cinema in the 1940s before being brought to Hollywood in the 1940s by producer Hal B. Wallis. He cast her in “Rope of Sand” (1949) opposite Burt Lancaster and Paul Henreid. In the 1950s, Calvet appeared in a string of films, usually playing French characters, opposite such leading men as Danny Kaye in “On the Riviera” (1951), Joseph Cotten in “Peking Express” (1951), James Cagney in “What Price Glory?” (1952), James Stewart in “The Far Country” (1954), Alan Ladd in “Thunder in the East” (1952), Tony Curtis in “So This Is Paris” (1955) and in “Sailor Beware” (1952) with Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. Calvet also continued to act in Italian and French productions as well as making appearances on American television series, with occasional roles in films. She made a rare television appearance on the “Colgate Comedy Hour” with Donald O’Connor on February 3, 1952, televised nationwide by NBC and would also appear on television in “Ford Television Theatre” in 1954, and “The Red Skelton Show” in 1956. Later in her career she made guest appearances on television shows such as “Burke’s Law”, “Police Story”, “Batman”, “Starsky & Hutch”, “Hart to Hart”, and “General Hospital”. Her last film was in “The Sword and the Sorcerer” (1982). In her memoir, entitled ‘Has Corinne Been a Good Girl?’ (1983), she stated that the roles she played for Hollywood studios never challenged her acting ability.

 

Corinne Calvet with Burt Lancaster in "Rope of Sand" (1949)

 

Calvet was married three times. Her first marriage was to actor John Bromfield from 1948 to 1954 who had co-starred with her in Rope of Sand and who, she claimed had been ordered to marry her by his studio. She was then married to Jeffrey Stone from 1955 to 1962 and Robert J. Wirt from 1968 to 1971. All three marriages ended in divorce.

 

Corinne Calvet

 

After the publication of her memoir in 1983, Corinne retired from acting and re-invented herself as a therapist, specialising in hypnosis. She settled down in Santa Monica, California where she died on June 23, 2001 of a cerebral hemorrhage.

 

Corinne Calvet - 1940

 

Corinne Calvet - 1942

 

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Celeste Holm

 

“I hated that. It’s stereotyped. I only played that kind of role in two pictures and that was enough, thank you. It’s not me.” ~  Celeste Holm on her wisecracking smart girl image.

 

Celeste Holm is an American stage, film, and television actress, known for her Academy Award-winning performance in “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), as well as for her Oscar-nominated performances in “Come to the Stable” (1949) and “All About Eve” (1950).

 

Celeste Holm

Holm was born April 29, 1917 in New York City. She grew up as an only child. Her mother, Jean Parke, was an American portrait artist and author and her father, Theodor Holm, was a Norwegian businessman whose company provided marine adjustment services for Lloyd’s of London. Because of her parents’ occupations, she traveled often during her youth and attended various schools in Holland, France and the United States. She graduated from University High School for Girls in Chicago, where she performed in many school stage productions. She then studied drama at the University of Chicago before becoming a stage actress in the late 1930s. Holm’s first professional theatrical role was in a production of “Hamlet” starring Leslie Howard and her first major Broadway part was as Mary L. in William Saroyan’s 1940 revival of “The Time of Your Life” co-starring fellow newcomer Gene Kelly. The role that got her the most recognition from critics and audiences was as Ado Annie in the flagship Broadway production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!” in 1943. After she starred in the Broadway production of “Bloomer Girl”,  20th Century Fox signed Holm to a movie contract in 1946 and she appeared in her first film “Three Little Girls in Blue”. With her third film “Gentlemen’s Agreement” (1947), Holm would win an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. She would be nominated twice more for Academy Awards in the “Come to the Stable” (1949) and “All About Eve” (1950). Holme preferred live theatre to film so she left Hollywood after making “All About Eve” to return to the stage. She made only two movies in the fifties; the MGM musicals “The Tender Trap” in 1955 with Frank Sinatra and Debbie Reynolds and “High Society” in 1956 with Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly, and Frank Sinatra.

 

Celeste Holm with director John Stahl at the Mocambo nightclub after winning her Oscar March 20, 1948 .

 

During the 1950’s, Celeste also appeared in her own television series “Honestly Celeste” (1954) and as a panelist on “Who Pays?” (1959) among other television appearances. For the next three decades, she would appear on television in regular series, mini series, and movies. Among her many television appearances during this time are: In 1965, she played the Fairy Godmother alongside Lesley Ann Warren in the CBS production of “Cinderella”; In 1970-71, she was featured on the NBC sitcom “Nancy”, with Renne Jarrett, John Fink, and Robert F. Simon; and in 1979, she played the role of First Lady Florence Harding in the television mini-series, “Backstairs at the White House”. Holm also appeared in many television series such as “Columbo”, “The Eleventh Hour”, “Archie Bunker’s Place”, “Magnum P.I.”, “Cheers”, and “Falcon Crest” and was a regular on the ABC soap opera “Loving”. She last appeared on television in the CBS television series Promised Land (1996–99). During the 1970s and 1980s, Holm did more screen acting, with roles in films such as “Tom Sawyer” (1973) and “Three Men and a Baby” (1987). In 2005 Holm appeared in “Alchemy” and in 2011, despite health ailments, she completed filming the comedy feature film, “College Debts”, directed by Dexter Warr and Joshua Zilm.

 

Bette Davis and Celeste Holm in "All About Eve" (1950)

 

Celeste Holms has been married five times. The first marriage was to Ralph Nelson in 1936. They had one son together. The marriage ended in divorce in 1939. Holm next married Francis Emerson Harding Davies, an English auditor, on January 7, 1940. Davies was a Roman Catholic, and Holm was received into the Roman Catholic Church for the purposes of their 1940 wedding. The marriage was dissolved on May 8, 1945. From 1946-52, Holm was married to airline public relations executive A. Schuyler Dunning, with whom she had a second son, businessman Daniel Dunning. Holm then married fellow thespian Wesley Addy in 1961. They remained married until his death in 1996. On April 29, 2004, her 87th birthday, Holm married opera singer Frank Basile, age 41. They are still married and currently living at their co-op on Central Park West in New York City.

 

Grace Kelly, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, and Celeste Holm in "High Society" (1956)

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Marceline Day

 

Marceline Day (April 24, 1908 – February 16, 2000) was an American motion picture actress whose career began as a child star in the 1910s and ended in the 1930s. Marceline was the younger sister of film actress Alice Day.

 

Marceline Day

 

Marceline Day was born Marceline Newlin on April 24, 1908, in Colorado Springs, Colorado and raised in Salt Lake City, Utah. She began her film career after her sister, Alice Day, became a featured actress as one of the Sennett Bathing Beauties in one and two-reel comedies for Keystone Studios appearing alongside her sister in the 1924 Mack Sennett comedy “Picking Peaches”. She was then cast in a string of comedy shorts opposite actor Harry Langdon and a stint in early Hollywood Westerns with such silent film cowboy stars as Hoot Gibson, Art Acord and Jack Hoxie. Day began appearing in more dramatic roles opposite such esteemed actors of the era as Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Norman Kerry, Ramón Novarro, Buster Keaton, and Lon Chaney. In 1926, Marceline Day was named one of the thirteen WAMPAS Baby Stars by the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers in the United States, which honored thirteen young women each year who they believed to be on the threshold of movie stardom. The publicity from the campaign added to Day’s popularity and in 1927 she appeared opposite John Barrymore in the romantic adventure “The Beloved Rogue”. Day went on to appear in the now lost 1927 Tod Browning directed horror classic “London After Midnight” with Lon Chaney and Conrad Nagel, the 1928 comedy “The Cameraman” with Buster Keaton, and the 1929 drama “The Jazz Age” with Douglas Fairbanks Jr. By the late 1920s, Day’s career had eclipsed her sister Alice’s, who was herself was a very popular actress. The two would appear together onscreen again in the 1929 musical “The Show of Shows”.

 

Marceline Day

Day transitioned into talkies with little problem, but her film roles gradually became lesser in quality and she began working primarily for lower-rung film studios. By 1933, Marceline Day made the transition back to the Western genre, appearing in “B” Westerns such as “The Pocatello Kid” (1931) with Ken Maynard,”The Fighting Fool” (1932) with Tim McCoy, “Broadway to Cheyenne” (1932) with Rex Bell, and “The Telegraph Trail” (1933) with John Wayne.

 

Marceline Day

 

Day retired from films fter making “The Fighting Parson” in 1933. After her retirement, she rarely spoke of her years as an actress and never spoke to reporters or granted interviews. Day was married twice, first married to silent film producer Arthur J. Klein, then, after divorcing, married John Arthur. She had no children with either husband.

 

Marceline Day

 

Marceline Day died on Feb. 16, 2000 of natural causes in Cathedral City, California, USA at the age of 91 and was cremated. Her ashes were given to family.

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Shirley Temple – A Pictorial

 

“Acting is the most minor of gifts. After all, Shirley Temple could do it when she was four.” ~ Katharine Hepburn

 

Shirley Temple

 

Gertrude Temple’s advice to her daughter before each scene was “Sparkle, Shirley, sparkle!”

 

Shirley Temple

 

“Any star can be devoured by human adoration, sparkle by sparkle.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple in "Curly Top" (1935)

 

“When I was 14, I was the oldest I ever was. I’ve been getting younger ever since.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Gary Cooper and Shirley Temple in "Now and Forever" (1934)

 

“I stopped believing in Santa Claus when I was six. Mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple

 

“One famous movie executive who shall remain nameless, exposed himself to me in his office. ‘Mr X,’ I said, ‘I thought you were a producer not an exhibitor’.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple in "I'll Be Seeing You" (1944)

 

“Shirley Temple doesn’t hurt Shirley Temple Black. Shirley Temple helps Shirley Temple Black. She is thought of as a friend, which I am!” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple

 

“Good luck needs no explanation.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers

 

“Ginger was brilliantly effective. She made everything work for her. Actually, she made things very fine for the both of us and she deserves most of the credit for our success.” ~ Fred Astaire on Ginger Rogers

 

“I adore the man. I always have adored him. It was the most fortunate thing that ever happened to me, being teamed with Fred. He was everything a little starry-eyed girl from a small town ever dreamed of.” ~ Ginger Rogers talking about Fred Astaire in 1976.

 

“Of course, Ginger was able to accomplish sex through dance. We told more through our movements instead of the big clinch. We did it all in the dance.” ~ Fred Astaire

 

“We had fun and it shows. True, we were never bosom buddies off the screen. We were different people with different interests. We were only a couple on film.” ~ Ginger Rogers

 

Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899- June 22, 1987) and Ginger Rogers (July 16, 1911- April 25, 1995) were the most famous dance team in motion picture history and are considered by many as the greatest dance duo to ever grace the silver screen. They made a total of ten movies together, nine with RKO Radio Pictures and one with MGM.

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in “Swing Time” (1936)

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in “Flying Down To Rio” (1933)

Fred Astaire started dancing in the early 1900s as a child on stage, in Vaudeville, partnering his older sister, Adele. Astaire made his first movie in 1933 with a minor role in “Dancing Lady” starring Clark Gable and Joan Crawford. Ginger Rogers was already on her way to being a headliner, starring in several movies including Warner Brothers Pictures pre-code hits “42nd Street” (1933) and “Gold Diggers of 1933″ (1933). Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers made their first pairing together in the movie “Flying Down to Rio” in 1933, but what many people don’t know is Fred and Ginger almost weren’t paired together in this movie. The role of Honey Hale was to be played by Dorothy Jordan, but she fell in love with the film’s producer Merian C. Cooper and when Dorothy dropped out of the film to get married the role was then given to Ginger Rogers. In “Flying Down to Rio” Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers had supporting roles behind the main stars Dolores Del Rio, Gene Raymond, and Raul Roulien. But it was Rogers and Astaire in their “secondary roles” as Honey Hale and Fred Ayers who easily were the best the movie had to offer. One of the more humorous scenes was when Astaire’s character Ayers is thrown out of a restaurant and he and Honey (Rogers) wind up sitting on the curb with an amused crowd of people gathered around them. Even the last scene of the movie is of Ayers and Honey Hale sitting side by side talking. Their chemistry and charisma as a couple were evident throughout the movie, but it was when they danced the erotic “Carioca” together that the beginning of the legendary dance team of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers was born.

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers – “The Gay Divorcee” (1934)

Despite their obvious on-screen chemistry in dancing with Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire was reluctant to make a second movie with her. He had previously been part of a dance duo with his sister, Adele Astaire and wanted to establish himself as a solo dancer.  After “Flying Down to Rio”, Astaire sent a note to his agent about Rogers. “I don’t mind making another picture with her, but as for this team idea, it’s out! I’ve just managed to live down one partnership and I don’t want to be bothered with any more.” But when the critics praised the Astaire-Rogers pairing in “Flying Down To Rio,” Astaire was persuaded, and he and Rogers soon made the second film in their partnership, starring in the very successful and popular musical “The Gay Divorcee” (1934). Fred and Ginger went on to make eight more movies together while becoming the most beloved and admired dancing screen couple in the history of cinema.

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in “The Barkleys of Broadway” (1949)

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr