Archive for May, 2012

John Wayne – A Pictorial

 

“Sure I wave the American flag. Do you know a better flag to wave? Sure I love my country with all her faults. I’m not ashamed of that, never have been, never will be.” ~ John Wayne

 

John Wayne


 

“I’ve always followed my father’s advice: he told me, first to always keep my word and, second, to never insult anybody unintentionally. If I insult you, you can be goddamn sure I intend to. And, third, he told me not to go around looking for trouble.” ~ John Wayne

 

John Wayne


 

“I am a demonstrative man, a baby picker-upper, a hugger and a kisser – that`s my nature.” ~ John Wayne

 

John Wayne with his third wife Pilar Pallete


 

“I’m an American actor. I work with my clothes on. I have to. Riding a horse can be pretty tough on your legs and elsewheres.” ~ John Wayne

 

John Wayne between takes of "Tall In The Saddle" (1944)


 

“I don’t want ever to appear in a film that would embarrass a viewer. A man can take his wife, mother, and his daughter to one of my movies and never be ashamed or embarrassed for going.” ~ John Wayne

 

John Wayne in "The Longest Day" (1962)


 

“I would like to be remembered, well . . . the Mexicans have a phrase, “Feo fuerte y formal”. Which means he was ugly, strong and had dignity.” ~ John Wayne

 

John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara - "The Quiet Man" (1952)


 

“God, how I hate solemn funerals. When I die, take me into a room and burn me. Then my family and a few good friends should get together, have a few good belts, and talk about the crazy old time we all had together.” ~ John Wayne

 

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Song and Dance: Rita Hayworth in “Cover Girl” (1944)

 

“Cover Girl” is a 1944 American musical film starring Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly. The film tells the story of a chorus girl given a chance at stardom when she is offered an opportunity to be a highly-paid cover girl. The film was directed by Charles Vidor and was one of the most popular musicals of the war years.

Rita Hayworth from “Cover Girl” (1944)

 

Rita Hayworth from “Cover Girl” (1944)

 

Rita Hayworth from “Cover Girl” (1944)

 

Rita Hayworth from “Cover Girl” (1944)

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Silver Screen Sirens: Mary Pickford

 

Mary Pickford (April 8, 1892 – May 29, 1979) was a Canadian-American motion picture actress, known as “America’s Sweetheart”, and was one of silent film’s most important performers and producers. As a co-founder of the film studio United Artists and one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Pickford was one of the pioneers in early Hollywood and a significant figure in the development of film acting. In consideration of her contributions to American cinema, the American Film Institute named Pickford 24th among the greatest female stars of all time.

 

Mary Pickford 1914

 

Mary Pickford 1916

 

Mary Pickford 1918

 

Mary Pickford 1920

 

Mary Pickford 1921

 

Mary Pickford

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Henry Fonda – A Pictorial

 

“I’m not really Henry Fonda. Nobody could have that much integrity.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda

 

“I’m not that pristine pure, I guess I’ve broken as many rules as the next feller. But I reckon my face looks honest enough and if people buy it, Hallelujah.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda in "Young Mr. Lincoln" (1939)

 

“If there is something in my eyes, a kind of honesty in the face, then I guess you could say that’s the man I’d like to be, the man I want to be.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Jane Danwell in "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940)

 

“I don’t really like myself. Never did. People mix me up with the characters I play. I’m not a great guy like Doug Roberts (in ‘Mister Roberts’). I’d like to be but I’m not.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Barbara Stanwyck in "The Lady Eve" (1941)

 

“Money must be, I guess, what first took me to Hollywood. When I first came out, I certainly had NO ambition to make pictures.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Cathy Downs in "My Darling Clementine" (1946)

 

“I look like my father. To this day, when I walk past a mirror and see my reflection in it, my first impression is: That’s my father. There is a strong Fonda look.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda in "12 Angry Men" (1957)

 

“I’ve been close to Bette Davis for thirty-eight years… and I have the cigarette burns to prove it.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Bette Davis in "Jezebel" (1938)

 

“My thinking was scrambled when Sullivan and I separated. Something happened to me that had never happend before. I couldn’t cope. It was heartbreak time. I thought it was the end of the world.” ~ Henry Fonda on his divorce from first wife Margaret Sullavan

 

Henry Fonda and Margaret Sullavan in "The Moon's Our Home" (1936)

 

“It has to do with the fact that Ford, for all his greatness, is an Irish egomaniac, as anyone who knows him will say.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

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June Duprez

June Duprez

 

June Duprez was born during an air raid in the final months of World War I on May 14, 1918 in Teddington, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom. The daughter of American vaudeville performer Fred Duprez, June began her acting career in her teen years with a theatre company. She made her first film, “The Crimson Circle”, in 1936. Her next film, “The Cardinal” (1936), was also a success, and she had a small role in “The Spy in Black” (1938). But it was her fourth film, “The Four Feathers” (1939), that made her a star. Her peak of success came with the landmark fantasy film “The Thief of Bagdad” (1940) with Conrad Veidt and Sabu. With her new found success and stardom Duprez moved to Hollywood. Her agent set her asking price at $50,000 per movie, but as Duprez had not yet achieved the level of popularity in America that she had in Britain, this tactic only served to place her out of contention for most roles. Duprez appeared in “Little Tokyo, U.S.A.” (1942), “Tiger Fangs” (1943), “None But the Lonely Heart” (1944) and “The Brighton Strangler” (1945) before performing well as part of  a top ensemble cast in René Clair’s film version of Agatha Christie’s “And Then There Were None” (1945). With her career going no where Duprez retired from films in 1948. She only appeared twice more, on television in “Robert Montgomery Presents” (1951) and her last credited performance was in the feature film “One Plus One” (1961).

 

June Duprez

June Duprez was married twice. The first marriage was at a young age to a doctor, but as her career blossomed in England the marriage unraveled and they divorced in 1942. Duprez married a second time in 1948 to George M. Moffett, Jr. a wealthy sportsman. The union produced two daughters but ended in divorce in 1965. Duprez lived in Rome, Italy, for several years, then returned to London to live out the remainder of her life.

 

June Duprez with Cary Grant in "None But The Lonely Heart" (1944)

 

June Duprez died after a long illness on October 30, 1984 in London, England at age 66.

 

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