Archive for January, 2014

Marla English a 1950s Hollywood Motion Picture Actress

 

Marla English was a motion picture actress from San Diego, California who appeared in several movies during the 1950s.

 

Marla English (January 4, 1935 – December 10, 2012)

Marla English (January 4, 1935 – December 10, 2012)

Marla English was born Marleine Gaile English on January 4, 1935 in San Diego, California to Bertha Lenore and Arthur H. English. Marla was a nickname given to her by friends of the family who took care of her when her mother fell ill in 1939. English started modeling bathing attire for leading advertising agencies at the age of twelve. During her teen years English enters several bathing beauty contests and each time emerges a winner. During her sophmore year in high school she became a member of San Diego’s Globe Theatre and played roles in their productions of “Mad Woman of Chaillot” and “Cricket on the Hearth” while continuing her modeling career. Upon graduating high school in 1952 English was signed to a contract by Paramount Pictures after winning a San Diego beauty pageant. Paramount brought English along slowly, putting her in bit parts in such films as “Red Garters” (1954) with Rosemary Clooney, Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” (1954) with James Stewart and Grace Kelly, and “Yankee Pasha” (1954) with Jeff Chandler and Rhonda Fleming. In 1955 English starred opposite John Ireland in “Hell’s Horizon” and with Ralph Meeker in “Desert Sands”.

 

Marla English entered several bathing beauty contests during her teen years and each time emerged a winner.

Marla English entered several bathing beauty contests during her teen years and each time emerged a winner.


 

English received a major break in 1955 when she was cast opposite Spencer Tracy in “The Mountain” (1956), a film which was to be made in France. English was given a smallpox vaccine before leaving to go on location and quickly developed a raging fever and decided to pull out of the movie. As a result Paramount suspends English and replaces her with Barbara Darrow. Parade Magazine was purportedly told that English had fallen in love with Paramount actor Larry Pennell and had became enraged when the studio would not give Pennell a role in the film so they could travel to France together and that was why she had pulled out of the movie. In a September 1955 interview with Parade, English admits pulling out of the film was a very dumb move and she was unsure why she decided against making “The Mountain”.

 

Marla English with John Ireland in the Columbia war drama "Hell's Horizon" (1955)

Marla English with John Ireland in the Columbia war drama
“Hell’s Horizon” (1955)


 

After Paramount dropped her contact English starred in mostly B-movie films throughout the rest of her Hollywood movie career. Some of these include “Three Bad Sisters” (1956), “Runaway Daughters” (1956), “The She Creature” (1956), and “Flesh and the Spur” (1956). English gave up her acting career in 1956 when she became engaged to San Diego businessman A. Paul Sutherland. English was just twenty-one at the time. Her final film role came in American International’s horror flick “Voodoo Woman” which was released in 1957. The couple married in 1956 and remained together until her death in 2012. English and Sutherland had four sons together and a daughter, Ann, from his previous marriage.

 

Marla English with Ralph Meeker in "Desert Sands" (1955)

Marla English with Ralph Meeker in “Desert Sands” (1955)


 

Marla English died December 10, 2012 in Tucson, Arizona after a four-year battle with cancer. English is survived by her husband of fifty-six years, her five children, eight grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Marla English and John Agar in "Flesh and the Spur" (1956)

Marla English and John Agar in “Flesh and the Spur” (1956)


 
Marla English with Mike Connors in "Voodoo Woman" (1957).

Marla English with Mike Connors in
“Voodoo Woman” (1957).

 

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Carole Landis – A Pictorial

 

“I wanted to be a success on the stage, the screen, or the radio. So I saved my money and when I had bus fare and $16.82 over, I told my mother, Clara, I was going to leave home. She was heartbroken, but she believed in me.” ~ Carole Landis

 

Carole Landis (January 1, 1919 – July 5, 1948)

Carole Landis
(January 1, 1919 – July 5, 1948)

 

“I want to be as good an actress as Bette Davis, and I’d like to be a great singer. But more than that I’d like to be happily married and have some children.” ~ Carole Landis

 

Carole Landis was born Frances Lillian Mary Ridste in Fairchild, Wisconsin. At an early age she bleached her hair blonde and changed her name to Carole Landis after her favorite actress, Carole Lombard.

Carole Landis was born Frances Lillian Mary Ridste in Fairchild, Wisconsin. At an early age she bleached her hair blonde and changed her name to Carole Landis after her favorite actress, Carole Lombard.

 

“We had a wonderful time everywhere overseas. But it was hard. For five months we never gave less than five shows a day. It was too cold to sleep nights and there wasn’t water enough to take a bath. I had to do my own washing. And I ate more sand and fog, than food.” ~ Carole Landis

 

Carole Landis was an American film and stage actress who worked as a contract-player for Twentieth Century-Fox in the 1940s.

Carole Landis was an American film and stage actress who worked as a contract-player for Twentieth Century-Fox in the 1940s.

 

“Every girl in the world wants to find the right man, someone who is sympathetic and understanding and helpful and strong, someone she can love madly.” ~ Carole Landis

 

Carole Landis posed for hundreds of cheesecake and swimsuit photos and was a popular pin-up with servicemen during World War II.

Carole Landis posed for hundreds of cheesecake and swimsuit photos and was a popular pin-up with servicemen during World War II.

 

“I know how Lupe Velez felt. You fight just so long and then you begin to worry about being washed up. You fear there’s one way to go and that’s down.” ~ Carole Landis on Lupe Velez’s suicide, which occurred years before her own.

 

Carole Landis visits with G.I.s and signs autographs in the Pacific during WWII. Landis traveled more than 100,000 miles during the war and spent more time visiting troops than any other actress.

Carole Landis visits with G.I.s and signs autographs in the Pacific during WWII. Landis traveled more than 100,000 miles during the war and spent more time visiting troops than any other actress.

 

“I have no intention of ending my career in a rooming house, with full scrapbooks and an empty stomach.” ~ Carole Landis

 

Carole Landis died of an intentional drug overdose at the age of 29 in 1948.  Landis was interred in Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.

Carole Landis died of an intentional drug overdose at the age of 29 in 1948. Landis was interred in Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.

 

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Shirley Temple — Happy New Year!!

                         Shirley Temple
                       Happy New Year!!

Shirley Temple -- Happy New Year -- 1934

Shirley Temple — Happy New Year — 1934

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