Archive for February, 2014

Joan Bennett – A Pictorial

 

“I don’t think much of most of the films I made, but being a movie star was something I liked very much.” ~ Joan Bennett

 

Joan Bennett (February 27, 1910 – December 7, 1990)

Joan Bennett
(February 27, 1910 – December 7, 1990)

 

“I feel positively like a Beatle.” ~ Joan Bennett in response to the attention she was getting with the success of the cult series Dark Shadows (1966).

 

Joan Bennett

Joan Bennett

 

“After ‘Trade Winds’ was released, I was greeted as Miss Lamarr in dimly lit restaurants. Personally, I liked the idea of escaping from all that bland, blonde innocence and thought the whole thing was very funny, but I don’t think Hedy found the comparisons very amusing.” ~ Joan Bennett

 

Joan Bennett

Joan Bennett

 

“Whenever trouble arose in Hollywood, the first cry for legal help was, ‘Get Giesler!’.” ~ Joan Bennett on Hollywood attorney Jerry Giesler

 

Joan Bennett

Joan Bennett

 

“That beautiful sister of mine was an overwhelming and volatile mixture. One had the feeling that she’d been shot from a canon and showered her sparks over an incredulous world with no thought or care where they fell, a carbon copy of father. She was like some silvery comet who streaked through life with daring speed, the wellspring of which was an inner confidence that I deeply admired. At times, particularly in childhood, I was intimidated by her but she dictated from an aura of affection for me that was never threatening.” ~ Joan Bennett

 

Joan Bennett with sister Constance attend a party for producer Walter Wanger (May 1936)

Joan Bennett with sister Constance attend a
party for producer Walter Wanger (May 1936)

 

“My film career faded. A man can go on playing certain roles till he`s sixty. But not a woman… The golden age is gone, and with it most of the people of great taste. It doesn’t seem to be any fun any more.” ~ Joan Bennett in a 1984 interview.

 

Joan Bennett with her Cocker Spaniel Bessie (1938)

Joan Bennett with her Cocker Spaniel Bessie (1938)

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“The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947) Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison

 

THE SPIRIT… so willing! THE FLESH… so weak!
THE ROMANCE… so wonderful!

 

“The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947 - 20th Century Fox)

“The Ghost and Mrs Muir”
(1947 – 20th Century Fox)

 

“The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” (1947 – 20th Century Fox) is a romantic fantasy film starring Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison along with George Sanders, Edna Best, and Natalie Wood. Produced by Fred Kohlmar and directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, the film was based on a 1945 novel of the same name written by Josephine Leslie under the pseudonym of R. A. Dick. In 1945, 20th Century Fox bought the film rights to the novel, which had been published only in the United Kingdom at that time. “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” was filmed entirely in California and released on June 26, 1947. Charles Lang was nominated for an Oscar for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White for his work on the film. Academy Award winner Bernard Herrmann wrote the score and while his work for this film was not nominated Herrmann considered his musical score for the “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” to have been his best.

 

Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney in “The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947)

Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney in “The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947)

 

The story line follows a strong willed widow Lucy Muir (Gene Tierney) who, with her young daughter Anna (Natalie Wood) and their maid Martha Huggins (Edna Best), start a new life in a small seaside cottage in 1900 England. On their first night, Mrs. Muir is visited by the ghostly apparition of the former owner, a rough looking but harmless sea captain named Daniel Gregg (Rex Harrison). At first they are hostile towards each other and Mrs. Muir refuses to be scared off. As time goes by Mrs. Muir and Captain Gregg’s ghost grow to respect each other and become friends. When Mrs. Muir finds herself in financial trouble the Captain dictates to her a novel about his life entitled Blood and Swash. His racy recollections make the book a bestseller, allowing Mrs. Muir and her daughter Anna to stay in the seaside cottage and live comfortably. While writing the book, the Captain and Mrs. Muir learn more about each other and become closer, eventually falling in love. Knowing their situation is hopeless, Captain Gregg convinces Mrs. Muir to see ‘real men’. When Mrs. Muir meets Miles Fairlee (George Sanders) and declares her intention to marry him, Captain Gregg decides to disappear from her life permanently. While Mrs. Muir is asleep, he bids her a touching farewell and tells her that when she wakes up she will remember him only as a dream. Shortly afterwards, Mrs. Muir is devastated to learn that Miles is already married and was just stringing her along. She is heartbroken and returns to spend the rest of her life as a single woman in Gull Cottage with her maid Martha to look after her. Mrs. Muir spends a long peaceful life at the cottage. Captain Gregg appears before her at the moment of her death, reaching out, he lifts her young spirit free of her body. The two walk out of the front door arm in arm, into the mist and eternity together.

 

Natalie Wood and Gene Tierney in "The Ghost and Mrs Muir" (1947)

Natalie Wood and Gene Tierney in
“The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947)


 
Gene Tierney and George Sanders in “The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947)

Gene Tierney and George Sanders in
“The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947)


 
Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison in “The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947)

Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison in
“The Ghost and Mrs Muir” (1947)


 
“You can be much more alone with other people than you are by yourself, even if it’s people you love. That sounds all mixed up, doesn’t it?” ~ Gene Tierney as Lucy Muir
 

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