Anita Louise

 

Anita Louise was an American film and television actress. Louise had delicate features and blonde hair, with an ageless grace which saw her through thirty years before the motion picture cameras, beginning as a child actress before becoming a featured player and leading lady during Hollywood’s Golden Age.

 

Anita Louise

Anita Louise

 

Anita Louise was born Anita Louise Fremault on January 9, 1915 in Manhattan, New York. Using the name Louise Fremault, she made her acting debut on Broadway at the age of six appearing with Walter Hampden in the Broadway production of “Peter Ibbetson” and was soon appearing regularly in Hollywood films. Louise made her first credited screen debut at the age of nine in the film “The Sixth Commandment” (1924). In 1929, Louise dropped her “Fremault” surname, billing herself by her first and second names only, Anita Louise. By her late teens she was being cast in leading and supporting roles in major productions. Among her film successes were “Madame Du Barry” (1934), “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (1935), “The Story of Louis Pasteur” (1936), “Anthony Adverse” (1936), “Marie Antoinette” (1938), “The Sisters” (1938), and “The Little Princess” (1939). Louise complained that her looks often interfered with her chances to obtain serious roles. By the 1940s, she was reduced to mostly secondary roles and her film career started to slow. Some of her films during this time were “Casanova Brown” (1944), “Nine Girls” (1944), “Love Letters” (1945), “The Bandit of Sherwood Forest” (1946), “Blondie’s Big Moment” (1947), and “Bulldog Drummond at Bay” (1947). Her last appearance on the big screen was in the 1952 war film “Retreat, Hell!”.

 

Anita Louise 1931

Anita Louise 1931


 

With the advent of television in the 1950s Louise was provided with further opportunities to continue her acting career. In what was one of her most famous and widely seen roles, Louise was cast as the gentle mother, Nell McLaughlin, in the CBS television series “My Friend Flicka” from 1956–1957, with co-stars Johnny Washbrook, Gene Evans, and Frank Ferguson. Louise was also the substitute host of “The Loretta Young Show” (1953) when Loretta Young was recuperating from surgery. Other shows Anita hosted included “Theater of Time” (1957) and “Spotlight Playhouse” (1958). Her last television appearance was in 1970 in an episode of “The Mod Squad”.

 

Anita Louise and Shirley Temple in "The Little Princess" (1939)

Anita Louise and Shirley Temple in “The Little Princess” (1939)


 

Anita Louise was married twice. The first time was to film producer Buddy Adler in 1940. The couple had two children and remained married until his death in 1960.
In 1962, Louise married Henry Berger and they were together until her death in 1970.

 

Anita Louise with her poodle - 1946

Anita Louise with her poodle – 1946

 

Anita Louise died of a stroke on April 25, 1970, aged 55, in West Los Angeles, California. Louise was interred next to her first husband Buddy Adler at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.

 

Anita Louise and Olivia de Havilland (1937)

Anita Louise and Olivia de Havilland (1937)

 

Anita Louise has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in recognition of her contribution to Motion Pictures at 6801 Hollywood Boulevard.

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