Filled Under: Anne Cornwall

Anne Cornwall appeared in many silent films

 

Anne Cornwall was an American actress who performed for forty years in many silent film productions starting in 1918 and later in talkies until 1959.

 

Anne Cornwall (January 17, 1897 – March 2, 1980)

Anne Cornwall
(January 17, 1897 – March 2, 1980)

Cornwall was born in Brooklyn, New York on January 17, 1897. She made her film debut in 1918 with a bit role in the silent film “The Knife” and was one of the thirteen Wampas Baby Stars of 1925. The brunette actress went on to appear in fifty seven films during her career, alternating between dramatic performances (most often in westerns) and with turns as baby-faced, wide-eyed leading ladies in comedies. Her best remembered roles were opposite Buster Keaton in “College” (1927) and as one of the two flappers in Laurel & Hardy’s two-reeler “Men O’War” (1929). After 1930 most of her roles were minor and often uncredited. Cornwall briefly reappeared before the public eye in 1957, when she made the personal-appearance rounds with her old co-star Buster Keaton on the occasion of the Paramount biopic “The Buster Keaton Story” (1957).

 

Anne Cornwall performed for forty years in many silent film productions starting in 1918

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall was married twice. First to writer/director Charles Maigne, then later to Los Angeles engineer Ellis Wing Taylor, who fathered her only child, Peter Taylor.

 

Anne Cornwall

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall died on March 2, 1980 in Van Nuys, California, USA.

 

Anne Cornwall

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall with Buster Keaton in “College” (1927)

Anne Cornwall with Buster Keaton
in “College” (1927)

 

Anne Cornwall (second from left) with Gloria Greer, Oliver Hardy and Stan Laurel in Men O' War (1929)

Anne Cornwall (second from left) with Gloria Greer, Oliver Hardy and Stan Laurel in Men O’ War (1929)

 

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