Filled Under: Cary Grant

On the set of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938)

 

“Bringing Up Baby” is a 1938 American screwball comedy film directed by Howard Hawks, starring Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant, and released by RKO Radio Pictures. The movie tells the story of a paleontologist (Cary Grant) winding up in various predicaments involving a woman (Katharine Hepburn) with a unique sense of logic and a leopard named “Baby”. “Baby” is played by Nissa, an eight year old female leopard. “George,” the bone-hiding pup belonging to Katharine Hepburn’s aunt in the movie is played by Skippy, aka. ‘Asta’ of “The Thin Man” (1934) fame. The rest of the supporting cast includes Charles Ruggles, Barry Fitzgerald, Walter Catlett, and May Robson.

Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and Nissa (Baby) between scenes of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938).

Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and Nissa (Baby) between scenes of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938).

 

Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and Nissa (Baby) between scenes of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938).

Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, and Nissa (Baby) between scenes of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938).

 

Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn with Nissa on the set of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938)

Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn with Nissa on the set of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938)

 

Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn with Nissa in what looks like a promo shot on the set of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938)

Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn with Nissa in what looks like a promo shot on the set of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938)

 

Katharine Hepburn with Nissa on the set of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938).

Katharine Hepburn with Nissa on the set of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938).

 

Katharine Hepburn with Nissa on the set of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938).

Katharine Hepburn with Nissa on the set of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938).

 

Director Howard Hawks, Cary Grant, and Katharine Hepburn on the set of Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Director Howard Hawks, Cary Grant, and Katharine Hepburn on the set of Bringing Up Baby (1938)

 

Howard Hawks visits with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn between scenes of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938)

Howard Hawks visits with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn between scenes of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938)

 

Howard Hawks directs Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn between scenes of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938)

Howard Hawks directs Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn between scenes of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938)

 

Katharine Hepburn stands on Cary Grant's shoulders on the set of "Bringing Up Baby" (1938)

Katharine Hepburn stands on Cary Grant’s shoulders on the set of “Bringing Up Baby” (1938)

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Grace Kelly on the set of “To Catch A Thief” (1955)

 

Grace Kelly on the set of “To Catch A Thief” (1955)

 

“To Catch a Thief” is a 1955 romantic thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis and John Williams. The movie is set on the French Riviera, and was based on the 1952 novel of the same name by David Dodge. This was Grace Kelly’s final film for Hitchcock as she became Princess Grace of Monaco in 1956.

 

Grace Kelly between scenes on the set of "To Catch A Thief" (1955)

 

Grace Kelly between takes on the set of "To Catch A Thief" (1955)

 

Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, and Alfred Hitchcock on the set of "To Catch A Thief" (1955)

 

Grace Kelly and Alfred Hitchcock take a break on the set of "To Catch A Thief" (1955)

 

Cary Grant and Grace Kelly help Alfred Hitchcock celebrate his birthday on the set of "To Catch A Thief" (1955)

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Cary Grant – A Pictorial

 

“Everybody wants to be Cary Grant. Even I want to be Cary Grant.” ~ Cary Grant

 

Cary Grant

 

“It’s important to know where you’ve come from so that you can know where you’re going. I probably chose my profession because I was seeking approval, adulation, admiration and affection.” ~ Cary Grant

 

Cary Grant

 

“The only really good thing about acting is that there`s no heavy lifting.” ~ Cary Grant

 

Cary Grant having a conversation with one of his best friends!!

 

“My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.” ~ Cary Grant

 

Cary Grant

 

“It seems that each new marriage is more difficult to survive than the last one. I’m rather a fool for punishment. I keep going back for more, don’t ask me why.” ~ Cary Grant on his many marriages

 

Cary Grant

 

“To succeed with the opposite sex, tell her you are impotent. She can`t wait to disprove it.” ~ Cary Grant

 

Cary Grant enjoying a day at the beach.

 

“I have no plans to write an autobiography, I will leave that to others. I’m sure they will turn me into a homosexual or a Nazi spy or something else.” ~ Cary Grant

 

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Night and Day: Cary Grant and Alexis Smith

"Night and Day" (1946 - Warner Bros)

 

 

“Night and Day” is a 1946 Technicolor Warner Bros. biographical film about American composer and songwriter Cole Porter. The movie was directed by Michael Curtiz and produced by Arthur Schwartz, with Jack L. Warner as executive producer. The screenplay was written by Charles Hoffman, Leo Townsend and William Bowers. The music score by Ray Heindorf and Max Steiner was nominated for an Academy Award. The film features over twenty of the best-known Porter songs, including the title song, “Night and Day”, “Begin the Beguine” and Mary Martin’s great rendition of “My Heart Belongs to Daddy”. Cary Grant stars as Cole Porter and Alexis Smith plays Linda Lee Porter, Porter’s wife of 35 years. Monty Woolley and Mary Martin appear as themselves, and the rest of the cast includes Jane Wyman, Eve Arden, Alan Hale, Dorothy Malone, Donald Woods, and Ginny Simms.

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Mary Martin performs “My Heart Belongs To Daddy” from “Night and Day” (1946)

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“Night and Day” is a highly fictionalized and sanitized version of Cole Porter’s life, leaving out amongst other things his homosexuality, he was a gay man in a marriage of convenience with a divorcee friend Linda Lee Thomas, Monty Wooley was a contemporary not a Professor, and many writers are skeptical of the extent of his military experience in the French Foreign Legion. The movie was panned by critics but the film was a huge success, chiefly because of the wealth of vintage Porter songs.

Alexis Smith and Cary Grant – “Night and Day” (1946)
Selena Royle and Cary Grant – “Night and Day” (1946)

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“Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House” – Cary Grant and Myrna Loy

 

Jim Blandings (Cary Grant):  “It’s a conspiracy, I tell you. The minute you start they put you on the all-American sucker list. You start out to build a home and wind up in the poorhouse. And if it can happen to me, what about the guys who aren’t making $15,000 a year? The ones who want a home of their own. It’s a conspiracy, I tell you, against every boy and girl who were ever in love.”

 

Theatrical Poster

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948 RKO Pictures) is a comedy starring Cary Grant and Myrna Loy. Grant and Loy play Jim and Muriel Blandings, a married couple with two daughters, who all live in a cramped New York City apartment. Muriel wants to remodel the apartment but Jim rejects the idea. After coming across an ad in the newspaper for new homes in Connecticut, the couple decides to buy and fix up an old home. Jim decides to buy an old farmhouse as a fixer up and gets bilked into purchasing “The Old Hackett Place” which is a dilapidated 200 year old farm house. The old house is declared to be structurally unsound by an engineer. Unlivable and unfixable, “The Old Hackett” place has to be torn down. The Blandings then hire an architect to design and build a new house on the site within a certain budget. Of course, this being a comedy, all kinds of problems arise with the building of a new house out in the country while working in the city. On top of that, Jim is handed the account for “Wham! Ham” at the advertising company where he works. He has to come up with a new slogan for selling “Wham! Ham!” very quickly or possibly lose his job. Also adding to the mix is Jim’s long suffering lawyer Bill Cole (played by Melvyn Douglass), who also happens to be Muriel’s high school sweetheart, with whom Muriel is still very close to. The movie also stars Reginald Denny as Mr. Simms, the architect hired to design and build the Blandings new house.

 

Cary Grant and Myrna Loy — Mr Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948)


 

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House is a great little comedy. Relaxing, easy to watch, with laughs from start to finish. Cary Grant is great as the bewildered and clueless husband-advertising executive caught up in a situation that is over his head. Myrna Loy as his loving and understanding wife is also very good. The chemistry between Grant and Loy is unmistakable and their comedic timing is delivered as only these two great stars can. Melvyn Douglas narrates the story from time to time and is very funny in his role as lawyer, friend, advisor, and ex college sweetheart. The rest of the supporting cast also adds to the comedy, as anything that can go wrong does.

 

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