Filled Under: Clark Gable

Clark Gable and Carole Lombard at home with their Siamese kittens.

 

Clark Gable and Carole Lombard at home with their Siamese kittens.

Clark Gable and Carole Lombard at home with their Siamese kittens.

Clark Gable and Carole Lombard at home with their Siamese kittens.

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“It Happened One Night” Sweeps the 1934 Academy Awards

 

At the 7th Academy Awards for 1934, held on February 27, 1935 at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California, Frank Capra’s romantic comedy “It Happened One Night” became the first film to perform a “clean sweep” of the top five categories; Best Picture, Best Director (Frank Capra), Best Actor (Clark Gable), Best Actress (Claudette Colbert) and Best Screenplay (Robert Riskin).

 

“It Happened One Night” (1934 – Columbia Pictures) won the Oscar for Best Picture

 

“It Happened One Night” (1934) is an American romantic comedy directed by Frank Capra, in which a pampered socialite (Claudette Colbert) tries to get out from under her father’s thumb, and falls in love with a roguish reporter (Clark Gable).

 

Frank Capra with his Oscar for best director for “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

Clark Gable gave his Oscar for “It Happened One Night” to a child who admired it, telling him it was the winning of the statue that had mattered, not owning it. The child returned the Oscar to the Gable family after Clark’s death.

 

Clark Gable with his Oscar for Best Actor in “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

Claudette Colbert was so convinced that she would lose the Oscar competition to write-in nominee Bette Davis, that she decided not to attend the awards ceremony. When Colbert won the Academy Award for Best Actress she was summoned from a train station to pick up her Oscar.

 

Shirley Temple gives Claudette Colbert her Oscar for Best Actress in “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

Robert Riskin won the Oscar for Best Screenplay for “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

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Clark Gable – A Pictorial

 

“I’m no actor and I never have been. What people see on the screen is me.” ~ Clark Gable

 

Clark Gable

 

“I worked like a son of a bitch to learn a few tricks and I fight like a steer to avoid getting stuck with parts I can’t play.” ~ Clark Gable

 

Clark Gable

 

“I hate a liar. Maybe because I’m such a good one myself, heh? Anyway, to find someone has told an out and out lie puts him on the other side of the fence from me for all time.” ~ Clark Gable

 

Clark Gable

 

“I am intrigued by glamorous women… A vain woman is continually taking out a compact to repair her makeup. A glamorous woman knows she doesn’t need to.” ~ Clark Gable

 

Clark Gable

 

“Hell, if I’d jumped on all the dames I’m supposed to have jumped on, I’d have had no time to go fishing.” ~ Clark Gable

 

Clark Gable and wife Carole Lombard

 

“It is an extra dividend when you like the girl you’ve fallen in love with.” ~ Clark Gable

 

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On The Set: “Gone With The Wind”

 

On the set of “Gone With The Wind” (1939).

 

“Gone with the Wind” is a 1939 American historical epic film adapted from Margaret Mitchell’s Pulitzer-winning 1936 novel of the same name. It was produced by David O. Selznick and directed by Victor Fleming from a screenplay by Sidney Howard. The film stars Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Havilland, and Hattie McDaniel. “Gone With The Wind” received 10 Academy Awards (8 competitive, 2 honorary), a record that stood for 20 years. “Ben-Hur” surpassed it in 1960. In the American Film Institute’s inaugural Top 100 Best American Films of All Time list of 1998, it was ranked fourth, and in 1989 was selected to be preserved by the National Film Registry. The film was the longest American sound film made up to that time at 3 hours 44 minutes, plus a 15 minute intermission, and was among the first of the major films shot in color (Technicolor), winning the first Academy Award for Best Cinematography in the category for color films. It became the highest-grossing film of all-time shortly after its release, holding the position until 1966. After adjusting for inflation, it has still earned more than any other film in box office revenue.

Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, and director Victor Fleming on the set of “Gone With The Wind” (1939)

 

David Selznick producer, Victor Fleming director, Vivien Leigh, and Clark Gable on the set of “Gone With The Wind” (1939)

 

Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, and producer David Selznick on the set of “Gone With The Wind” (1939)

 

Vivien Leigh on the set of “Gone With The Wind” (1939)

 

Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable on the set of “Gone With The Wind” (1939)

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Beach Beauties of The Silent Era: Clara Bow, Anita Page, Dorothy Sebastian

 

Beach Beauties Of The Silent Era

 

Clara Bow

 

Dorothy Sebastian and Joan Crawford enjoy a picnic at the beach - 1927

 

Dorothy Sebastian and Anita Page c.1929

 

Sally Blane, Louise Brooks, Nancy Phillips 1927

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