Filled Under: Fred Astaire

Happy New Year 2015

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

 

Bing Crosby, Marjorie Reynolds, Fred Astaire
and Virginia Dale in “Holiday Inn” (1942)

 

Bing Crosby, Marjorie Reynolds, Fred Astaire and Virginia Dale in Holiday Inn (1942)

Bing Crosby, Marjorie Reynolds, Fred Astaire and Virginia Dale in “Holiday Inn” (1942)

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Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

“You Were Never Lovelier” (1942 – Columbia Pictures) is a musical comedy starring Fred Astaire, Rita Hayworth, Adolphe Menjou and Xavier Cugat, with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The film was directed by William A. Seiter.  “You Were Never Lovelier” was the second of Astaire’s outings with Hayworth, the first being “You’ll Never Get Rich” (1941), both of which were very successful.

 

Director William A. Seiter with Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Director William A. Seiter with Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire enjoy a smoke break on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire enjoy a smoke break on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Shirley Temple visits Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Shirley Temple visits Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Shirley Temple dances with Fred Astaire while Rita Hayworth watches on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Shirley Temple dances with Fred Astaire while Rita Hayworth watches on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

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“You Were Never Lovelier” (1942) with Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth

 

HAYWORTH–never lovelier! ASTAIRE–never more exciting!
KERN’S MUSIC–never more inspired!

 

“You Were Never Lovelier” (1942 – MGM)

 

“You Were Never Lovelier” (Columbia Pictures) is a 1942 Hollywood musical comedy film, set in Buenos Aires. The movie stars Fred Astaire, Rita Hayworth, Adolphe Menjou and Xavier Cugat, also with Isobel Elsom, Leslie Brooks, Adele Mara, and Gus Schilling. The film was directed by William A. Seiter. “You Were Never Lovelier” was the second of Astaire’s outings with Hayworth after the box-office success of the earlier “You’ll Never Get Rich” in 1941. Music is by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Johnny Mercer. Kern and Mercer provide two songs for the movie that have become standards, “Dearly Beloved” and “I’m Old Fashioned”. The dance sequence to “I’m Old Fashioned” with Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth is as pure and romantic as any Hollywood as ever offered. Hayworth and Astaire also team up in a combination American swing and tap dancing routine to the song “The Shorty George” in which they both get to show off their dancing skills. Astaire shines in his “Audition Dance” which Astaire himself called one of his best solos ever. Initially, Kern was unhappy about the selection of Xavier Cugat and his orchestra. But when production was complete, he was so pleased with the band’s performance that he presented Cugart with a silver baton. Although Hayworth had a fine voice, Harry Cohn insisted on her singing being dubbed throughout by Nan Wynn.

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire – “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

The Acunas, a rich Argentine family, have the tradition that the daughters have to get married in order, oldest first and in the Acuna household tradition rules. When sister #1 gets married, sisters #3 and #4 (Leslie Brooks and Adele Mara)  put pressure on Maria (Rita Hayworth), sister #2, because they have their husbands picked out already. But Maria hasn’t yet met a man she likes. Eduardo Acuna (Adolphe Menjou), believing that men aren’t romantic enough these days, sends his daughter flowers and anonymous love letters, creating a “mystery man” for her to fall in love with. He intends to pick out an appropriate beau for her later, to fill the role. But when Robert Davis (Fred Astaire), an American dancer looking for work, stumbles into the picture romance ensues, much to the delight of the younger Acuna sisters and the dismay of Mr. Acuna.

 

Rita Hayworth promo for “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

“You Were Never Lovelier” was nominated for three Academy Awards: Music Scoring of a Musical Picture, Music Song (for Dearly Beloved), and Sound Recording.

 

        “I’m Old Fashioned” — Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth

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Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers

 

“Ginger was brilliantly effective. She made everything work for her. Actually, she made things very fine for the both of us and she deserves most of the credit for our success.” ~ Fred Astaire on Ginger Rogers

 

“I adore the man. I always have adored him. It was the most fortunate thing that ever happened to me, being teamed with Fred. He was everything a little starry-eyed girl from a small town ever dreamed of.” ~ Ginger Rogers talking about Fred Astaire in 1976.

 

“Of course, Ginger was able to accomplish sex through dance. We told more through our movements instead of the big clinch. We did it all in the dance.” ~ Fred Astaire

 

“We had fun and it shows. True, we were never bosom buddies off the screen. We were different people with different interests. We were only a couple on film.” ~ Ginger Rogers

 

Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899- June 22, 1987) and Ginger Rogers (July 16, 1911- April 25, 1995) were the most famous dance team in motion picture history and are considered by many as the greatest dance duo to ever grace the silver screen. They made a total of ten movies together, nine with RKO Radio Pictures and one with MGM.

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in “Swing Time” (1936)

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in “Flying Down To Rio” (1933)

Fred Astaire started dancing in the early 1900s as a child on stage, in Vaudeville, partnering his older sister, Adele. Astaire made his first movie in 1933 with a minor role in “Dancing Lady” starring Clark Gable and Joan Crawford. Ginger Rogers was already on her way to being a headliner, starring in several movies including Warner Brothers Pictures pre-code hits “42nd Street” (1933) and “Gold Diggers of 1933″ (1933). Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers made their first pairing together in the movie “Flying Down to Rio” in 1933, but what many people don’t know is Fred and Ginger almost weren’t paired together in this movie. The role of Honey Hale was to be played by Dorothy Jordan, but she fell in love with the film’s producer Merian C. Cooper and when Dorothy dropped out of the film to get married the role was then given to Ginger Rogers. In “Flying Down to Rio” Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers had supporting roles behind the main stars Dolores Del Rio, Gene Raymond, and Raul Roulien. But it was Rogers and Astaire in their “secondary roles” as Honey Hale and Fred Ayers who easily were the best the movie had to offer. One of the more humorous scenes was when Astaire’s character Ayers is thrown out of a restaurant and he and Honey (Rogers) wind up sitting on the curb with an amused crowd of people gathered around them. Even the last scene of the movie is of Ayers and Honey Hale sitting side by side talking. Their chemistry and charisma as a couple were evident throughout the movie, but it was when they danced the erotic “Carioca” together that the beginning of the legendary dance team of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers was born.

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers – “The Gay Divorcee” (1934)

Despite their obvious on-screen chemistry in dancing with Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire was reluctant to make a second movie with her. He had previously been part of a dance duo with his sister, Adele Astaire and wanted to establish himself as a solo dancer.  After “Flying Down to Rio”, Astaire sent a note to his agent about Rogers. “I don’t mind making another picture with her, but as for this team idea, it’s out! I’ve just managed to live down one partnership and I don’t want to be bothered with any more.” But when the critics praised the Astaire-Rogers pairing in “Flying Down To Rio,” Astaire was persuaded, and he and Rogers soon made the second film in their partnership, starring in the very successful and popular musical “The Gay Divorcee” (1934). Fred and Ginger went on to make eight more movies together while becoming the most beloved and admired dancing screen couple in the history of cinema.

 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in “The Barkleys of Broadway” (1949)

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Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly

 

Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly were the two most popular and best known male dancers in the history of cinema. They have both co-starred and danced with many of the most beautiful actresses/dancers of their time. The only time they ever danced together on the big screen was in “Ziegfeld Follies” (1946 – MGM).

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire rehearsing for "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire rehearsing for "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire in "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire in "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire in "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

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