Filled Under: Gene Kelly

Gene Kelly – A Pictorial

 

“I never wanted to be a dancer. It’s true! I wanted to be a shortstop for the Pittsburgh Pirates.” ~ Gene Kelly

 

Gene Kelly Portrait 1958

Gene Kelly (1958 portrait)

 

“I got started dancing because I knew it was one way to meet girls.” ~ Gene Kelly

 

Gene Kelly

Gene Kelly

 

“I’d studied dance in Chicago every summer and taught it all winter, and I was well-rounded. I wasn’t worried about getting a job on Broadway. In fact, I got one the first week.” ~ Gene Kelly

 

Gene Kelly from "Summer Stock" (1950)

Gene Kelly from “Summer Stock” (1950)

 

“I arrived in Hollywood twenty pounds overweight and as strong as an ox. But if I put on a white tails and tux like Fred Astaire, I still looked like a truck driver.” ~ Gene Kelly

 

Gene Kelly with Esther Williams and Frank Sinatra in a promo for "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" (1949)

Gene Kelly with Esther Williams and Frank Sinatra in a promo for “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” (1949)

 

“I took it as it came and it happened to be very nice.” ~ Gene Kelly on his career.

 

Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly arrive in New York 1958

Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly arrive in New York 1958

 

“Kids talk to me and say they want to do musicals again because they’ve studied the tapes of the old films. We didn’t have that. We thought once we had made it, even on film, it was gone except for the archives.” ~ Gene Kelly

 

Gene Kelly with daughter Kerry 1942

Gene Kelly with daughter Kerry 1942

 

“There is a strange sort of reasoning in Hollywood that musicals are less worthy of Academy consideration than dramas. It’s a form of snobbism, the same sort that perpetuates the idea that drama is more deserving of Awards than comedy.” ~ Gene Kelly

 

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Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly

 

Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly were the two most popular and best known male dancers in the history of cinema. They have both co-starred and danced with many of the most beautiful actresses/dancers of their time. The only time they ever danced together on the big screen was in “Ziegfeld Follies” (1946 – MGM).

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire rehearsing for "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire rehearsing for "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire in "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire in "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

 

Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire in "Ziegfeld Follies" (1946)

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“Three Musketeers” (1948) – Gene Kelly, Lana Turner, June Allyson

 

Athos (Van Heflin): “To die among friends. Can a man ask more? Can the world offer less? Who wants to live ’till the last bottle is empty? It’s all-for one, d’Artagnan, and one for all.”

 

Three Musketeers (1948) Theatrical Poster


 

“Three Musketeers” (1948) is a star studded MGM adaptation of the classic novel The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas. The cast reads like a who’s who of grade ‘A’ stars from that era: Lana Turner as Lady de Winter, Gene Kelly as d’Artagnan, June Allyson as Constance Bonacieux, Van Heflin as Athos, Angela Lansbury as Queen Anne, Frank Morgan as King Louis XIII, Vincent Price as Cardinal Richelieu, Keenan Wynn as Planchet, John Sutton as the Duke of Buckingham, Gig Young as Porthos, Robert Coote as Aramis, Reginald Owen as Treville, Ian Keith as Rochefort (Richelieu’s chief henchman), Patricia Medina as Kitty (Lady de Winter’s maid), and Richard Stapley as Albert.

 
 

Gene Kelly, in a non-singing non-dancing role, is very good as D’Artagnan, as he shows off his athletism with amazing action and swordplay sequences and even though he has many serious scenes, Kelly’s personality shows as he is able to bring humor into his role when needed. Lana Turner is also very good as the beautiful but cold and deadly Lady de Winter. In this version, Constance Bonacieux is the goddaughter of D’Artagan’s landlord and she is beautifully portrayed by June Allyson. Allyson’s and Turner’s scenes together towards the end of the movie are very suspenseful and tragic, and are among the movie’s best. Vincent Price is well cast as the strong Cardinal Richelieu and convincingly delivers one of the best lines in the movie as he whispers in the king’s ear, “I am the State your Majesty. I am France!” The acting by the rest of the cast is also well done!

 

Gig Young, Robert Coote, Gene Kelly, Van Heflin – Three Musketeers (1948)


 

Filmed in technicolor and directed by George Sidney, the movie is fast paced, with expert action scenes and great swordplay. Energetic, romantic, humorous, tragic, and suspenseful, this adaptation of “Three Musketeers” is one of the best ever done.

 

Lana Turner and June Allyson in “The Three Musketeers” (1948).

Lana Turner and Gene Kelly in “The Three Musketeers” (1948).

Lana Turner and Vincent Price – “The Three Musketeers” (1948).

Angela Lansbury, Van Heflin, Robert Coote, Gig Young – “Three Musketeers” (1948)

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