Filled Under: Humphrey Bogart

Humphrey Bogart – A Pictorial

 

“I have absolutely no interest in who gets the girl. I don’t care. I don’t see any reason to spend two hours to see who gets the girl especially since you know who’s going to get her from the beginning, usually the actor who gets the most money.” ~ Humphrey Bogart

 

Humphrey Bogart

Humphrey Bogart

 

“She’s a real Joe. You’ll fall in love with her like everybody else.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Lauren Bacall

 

Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart laughing on set between takes of the Producer's Showcase live telecast of The Petrified Forest (1955).

Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart laughing on set between takes of the Producer’s Showcase live telecast of The Petrified Forest (1955).

 

“I didn’t do anything I’ve never done before, but when the camera moves in on that Bergman face, and she’s saying she loves you, it would make anybody feel romantic.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Ingrid Bergman

 

Humphrey Bogart with Ingrid Bergman in "Casablanca" (1942)

Humphrey Bogart with Ingrid Bergman in “Casablanca” (1942)

 

“Even when I was carrying a gun, she scared the bejesus out of me.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Bette Davis

 

Humphrey Bogart with Bette Davis in "Dark Victory" (1939)

Humphrey Bogart with Bette Davis in “Dark Victory” (1939)

 

“She talks at you as though you were a microphone. She lectured the hell out of me on temperance and the evils of drink. She doesn’t give a damn how she looks. I don’t think she tries to be a character. I think she is one.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Katharine Hepburn

 

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn at a press reception at Claridges in Mayfair, London (1951)

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn at a press reception at Claridges in Mayfair, London (1951)

 

“You could argue with her, but she was tough. When Jack (cinematographer Jack Cardiff) saw her striding into the jungle alone one morning, he thought, ‘God help the jungle’.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Katharine Hepburn during the filming of “The African Queen” (1951)

 

Humphrey Bogart with Katharine Hepburn in "The African Queen" (1952)

Humphrey Bogart with Katharine Hepburn in “The African Queen” (1952)

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On the set of “Casablanca” (1942) Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman

 

“Casablanca” is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Paul Henreid, and featuring Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre and Dooley Wilson. Set during World War II, it focuses on a man torn between, in the words of one character, love and virtue. He must choose between his love for a woman and helping her and her Czech Resistance leader husband escape from the Vichy-controlled Moroccan city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis. “Casablanca” won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Its characters, dialogue, and music have become iconic, and the film has grown in popularity to the point that it now consistently ranks near the top of lists of the greatest films of all time.

 

Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman on the set of “Casablanca” (1942)

 

Claude Rains watches Humphrey Bogart and Paul Henreid play chess on the set of “Casablanca” (1942)

 

Humphrey Bogart and Dooley Wilson hanging out on the set of “Casablanca” (1942)

 

Director Michael Curtiz with Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman on the set of “Casablanca” (1942)

 

Humphrey Bogart filming home movies of production from a ladder on the set of “Casablanca” (1942)

 

Director Michael Curtiz filming Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman on the set of “Casablanca” (1942)

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On the set: “Sabrina” (1953) Audrey Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart, William Holden

 

“Sabrina” is a 1954 comedy-romance film directed by Billy Wilder, adapted for the screen by Wilder, Samuel A. Taylor, and Ernest Lehman from Taylor’s play Sabrina Fair. The movie stars Humphrey Bogart, Audrey Hepburn, and William Holden. “Sabrina” was Wilder’s last film released by Paramount Pictures, ending a 12-year relation between Wilder and Paramount.

 

“Sabrina” won an Academy Award for Best Costume Design (Edith Head) and was nominated for five more Academy Awards; Best Director (Billy Wilder), Best Actress (Audrey Hepburn), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White (Hal Pereira, Walter H. Tyler, Sam Comer, Ray Moyer), Best Cinematography, Black-and-White (Charles Lang), and Best Writing, Screenplay (Billy Wilder, Samuel A. Taylor, Ernest Lehman).

 

Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Sabrina" (1945)

 

William Holden and Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Sabrina" (1945)

 

Humphrey Bogart and Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Sabrina" (1945)

 

Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Sabrina" (1945 photo by Mark Shaw)

 

Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Sabrina" (1945)

 

Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Sabrina" (1945)

 

Audrey Hepburn with make up artist Wally Westmore on the set of "Sabrina" (1945)

 

Audrey Hepburn being ahampooed on the set of "Sabrina" (1945 Photo by Mark Shaw)

 

Audrey Hepburn being ahampooed on the set of "Sabrina" (1945 photo by Mark Shaw)

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On the set of “The African Queen” (1951) Humphrey Bogart

 

On the set of “The African Queen” (1951)

 

The African Queen” is a 1951 adventure drama film adapted from the 1935 novel of the same name by C. S. Forester. The film was directed by John Huston and produced by Sam Spiegel and John Woolf. The screenplay was adapted by James Agee, John Huston, John Collier and Peter Viertel. It was photographed in Technicolor by Jack Cardiff and had a music score by Allan Gray. The film stars Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn with Robert Morley, Peter Bull, Walter Gotell, Richard Marner and Theodore Bikel. Humphrey Bogart won an Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role for “The African Queen”. The movie also recieved three other Academy Award nominations: Best Actress in a Leading Role nomination for Katharine Hepburn, Best Director nomination for John Huston, and a Best Writing, Screenplay nomination for James Agee and John Huston. “The African Queen” has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry, with the Library of Congress deeming it “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant”.

 

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn relaxing during location shooting on "The African Queen" (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn relaxing during location shooting on “The African Queen” (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

 

Humphrey Bogart and wife Lauren Bacall sharing a meal during the filming of "The African Queen"

Humphrey Bogart and wife Lauren Bacall sharing a meal during the filming of “The African Queen”

 

John Juston putting rubber leaches on Humphrey Bogart during the filming of "The African Queen." Huston wanted to use real leeches but Bogie nixed that idea!!

John Juston putting rubber leaches on Humphrey Bogart during the filming of “The African Queen.” Huston wanted to use real leeches but Bogie nixed that idea!!

 

Katharine Hepburn relaxing with a cigarette during filming of "The African Queen" (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

Katharine Hepburn relaxing with a cigarette during filming of “The African Queen” (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

 

Katharine Hepburn, Lauren Bacall, and Humphrey Bogart relax between shoots on the set of "The African Queen"

Katharine Hepburn, Lauren Bacall, and Humphrey Bogart relax between shoots on the set of “The African Queen”

 

Lauren Bacall making sandwiches for cast and crew of "The African Queen" (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

Lauren Bacall making sandwiches for cast and crew of “The African Queen” (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

 

Lauren Bacall, director John Huston, Katherine Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart resting between takes on the set of the film "The African Queen" (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

Lauren Bacall, director John Huston, Katherine Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart resting between takes on the set of the film “The African Queen” (Photo by Eliot Elisofon) LIFE

 

Lauren Bacall, Humphrey Bogart, and Katharine Hepburn

Lauren Bacall, Humphrey Bogart, and Katharine Hepburn

 

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Sahara (1943) Humphrey Bogart

 

A mighty story of adventure, courage and glory in the desert!…tender human emotion…triumphant action…matchless thrills…a memorable entertainment experience!

 

Sahara

Sahara (1943 Columbia) is a hard, tough WWII movie set in the Sahara Desert of Northern Africa, with Humphrey Bogart as the leading star. Bogart plays tank commander Sgt. Joe Gunn who is heading across the Sahara Desert with his M3 tank, which is lovingly called “Lulubelle”,  and his tank crew to rejoin his command after the fall of Tobruk. Along the way they come across five British soldiers, a Frenchman, and a Sudanese man with an Italian prisoner who all band together for the trek through the desert wasteland. In search of water they find an old abandoned well that they wind up defending against a much larger German force. The movie is directed by Zolton Korda and also stars Bruce Bennett, J. Carroll Naish, Dan Duryea, and Lloyd Bridges. Sahara earned three Academy Award nominations: Best Sound, Best Cinematography, and a Best Supporting Actor nomination for J. Carroll Naish for his portrayal of the Italian prisoner, Giuseppe.

 

The movie was filmed and released during WWII and was intended to be a propaganda piece for the U.S. government. In a 1992 interview by the San Francisc Chronicle, Kurt Krueger, who played a sterotypical nazi in the film, commented on the emotions felt while making this film. Said Krueger, “I was running across the dunes when Tambul jumped on top of me and pressed my head into the sand to suffocate me. Only Zolton forgot to yell cut, and Ingram was so emotionally caught up in the scene that he kept pressing my face harder and harder. Finally, I went unconscious. Nobody knew this. Even the crew was transfixed watching this dramatic ‘killing’. If Zolton hadn’t finally said cut, as an afterthought, it would have been all over for me.”

 

Humphrey Bogart in “Sahara” (1942)

Sahara does not seem to be one of Humphrey Bogart’s most famous or popular movies, but I personally think it was one of his best. It is well directed and well acted, with a great story. I would recommend Sahara to any Bogart or WWII movie fan.

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