Filled Under: Marilyn Monroe

On the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

On the set of
“There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

“There’s No Business Like Show Business” is a 1954 20th Century-Fox musical-comedy-drama starring Ethel Merman, Dan Dailey, Donald O’Connor, Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Richard Eastham, and Johnnie Ray. The film was directed by Walter Lang and written by Lamar Trotti (story) and Phoebe Ephron and Henry Ephron with music by Irving Berlin. “There’s No Business Like Show Business” was filmed in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color.

 

Director Walter Lang and Mitzi Gaynor on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Director Walter Lang and Mitzi Gaynor on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Irving Berlin visits with Marilyn Monroe on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Irving Berlin visits with Marilyn Monroe on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Ethel Merman visits with Ceasar Romero on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Ethel Merman visits with Ceasar Romero on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Johnnie Ray and director Walter Lang on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Johnnie Ray and director Walter Lang on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe and Donald O’Connor on the set of "There’s No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe and Donald O’Connor on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Ethel Merman and Dan Dailey relax on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Ethel Merman and Dan Dailey relax on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Johnnie Ray, Mitzi Gaynor, Dan Dailey, Ethel Merman, Donald O´Connor and Marilyn Monroe preparing for the big number on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Johnnie Ray, Mitzi Gaynor, Dan Dailey, Ethel Merman, Donald O´Connor and Marilyn Monroe preparing for the big number on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe gets hair and make-up touch ups on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe gets hair and make-up touch ups on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe  on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe relaxes between scenes on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe relaxes between scenes on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe outside her trailer during the filming of "There’s No Business Like Show Business"  (1954)

Marilyn Monroe outside her trailer during the filming of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe wardrobe fitting and photo for "There’s No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe wardrobe fitting and photo for “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Donald O'Connor and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Donald O’Connor and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

On The Set of “How To Marry A Millionaire” (1953) Monroe, Gable, and Bacall

 

“How to Marry a Millionaire” is a 1953 romantic comedy film made by 20th Century Fox, directed by Jean Negulesco and produced and written by Nunnally Johnson. The music score was by Alfred Newman and the cinematography by Joseph MacDonald. The costume design was by Travilla. The film stars Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable, and Lauren Bacall, as three gold diggers along with actors William Powell, David Wayne, Rory Calhoun, Cameron Mitchell, Alex D’Arcy, and Fred Clark. “How to Marry a Millionaire” was the first film ever to be photographed in the new CinemaScope wide-screen process, and the second released, after The Robe.It was also the first 1950’s color and CinemaScope film ever to be shown on prime time network television, when it was shown as the first installment of NBC Saturday Night at the Movies in 1961.

 

Marilyn Monroe on set of "How to Marry a Millionaire" (1953)

 

Marilyn Monroe and Betty Grable on set of "How to Marry a Millionaire" (1953)

 

Lauren Bacall, Betty Grable, and Marilyn Monroe on the set of "How To Marry A Millionaire" (1953)

 

Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable and Lauren Bacall on the set of "How To Marry A Millionaire" (1953)

 

Lauren Bacall and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of "How to Marry a Millionaire" (1953)

 

Lauren Bacall, Humphrey Bogart, and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of "How to Marry a Millionaire" (1953)

 

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Beach Beauties: Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach, New York – 1949

       Beach Beauties: Marilyn Monroe on
          Tobey Beach, New York – 1949

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach - 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach – 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

 

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach - 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach – 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

 

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach - 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach – 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

 

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach - 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach – 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

 

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach - 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach – 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

 

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach - 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

Marilyn Monroe on Tobey Beach – 1949 (Photo by Andre de Dienes)

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Marilyn Monroe and Ella Fitzgerald

 

Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald

Marilyn Monroe and Ella Fitzgerald fans probably know this story, but for those of you who don’t….. In the early to mid 50’s Ella Fitzgerald was reaching the height of her great career. She was already one of the top selling jazz artist in the world at that time, but was having trouble getting booked at some of the bigger and more popular nightclubs. The Mocambo night club in East Hollywood, a white’s only club, was the most popular dance spot around but would not book Ella because she was black. Marilyn, who adored Ella and her music, called the manager and demanded that they book Ella immediately. Marilyn told them that she would sit front row every night Ella would perform which would give the Mocambo great publicity due to Marilyn’s superstar status at the time. The manager of the Mocambo agreed and Ella became the first black performer to ever appear in the nightclub. Marilyn and Ella would remain close friends until Marilyn’s death.

Ella told the story in an August 1972 article in MS magazine:    “I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt. It was because of her that I played the Mocambo, a very popular nightclub in the ’50s. She personally called the owner of the Mocambo (who had refused to book Fitzgerald because she was black), and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night. She told him – and it was true, due to Marilyn’s superstar status – that the press would go wild. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard… After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again. She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it.” – Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe listening to jazz at Hollywood's Tiffany Club in 1955.

Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe listening to jazz at Hollywood’s Tiffany Club in 1955.

 

.

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Marilyn Monroe Visits Troops In Korea, 1954

 

 Marilyn Monroe Visits Troops In Korea

 
Marilyn on how she felt in Korea: “For the first time in my life, I had a feeling that the people seeing me were accepting and liking me.”
 

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio were on their honeymoon in Tokyo, Japan in February of 1954 when Marilyn recieved an invitation from General John E. Hull’s Far East command to entertain the U.S. troops stationed in war torn Korea. After a little thought and discussion with her husband she said yes. It should be said though that Joe objected to her going to Korea at that time as he feared for her safety. The armistice had just been signed in July of 1953 and she was going to do some of her shows very close to the front lines which was still a very dangerous place at that time, but she said it was “the least she could do.”  Her whirlwind tour consisted of ten shows in four days in sub-zero temperatures. Wearing nothing but a skin tight, low cut, plum colored sequined gown, she wowed the troops with her singing, dancing, and banter. Everywhere she went she was greeted with warmth and appreciation. One Army Corps of Engineers officer said of Marilyn, *“Of all the performers who came to us in Korea-and there were a half a dozen or so-she was the best…..It was bitter cold, but she was in no hurry to leave. Marilyn was a great entertainer. She made thousands of GI’s feel like she really cared.”

 

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe performed with a band made up of eleven servicemen called Anything Goes. Her pianist, Albert Guastafeste was taken aback by how down to earth and modest she was. He was quoted as saying,“Someone ought to go up to her and tell her she is Marilyn Monroe. She doesn’t seem to realize it. When you make a goof she tells you she’s sorry. When she goofs, she apologizes to me!” During her tour she also visited hospitals in Japan where wounded servicemen lay, stopping to talk, shaking hands, signing autographs, posing with all that asked for pictures. Even though she was totally exhausted from the tour and caught a mild case of pneumonia, she later told her friend Amy Greene that the Korea tour was one of the highlights of her entire career.

 

Marilyn Monroe with troops in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe with troops in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Marilyn Monroe in Korea Feb. 1954

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr