Filled Under: Myrna Loy

Myrna Loy: Happy New Year!!

Myrna Loy sleeping on the job while bringing in the New Year!!

Myrna Loy Happy New Year 1927

Myrna Loy 1927

               HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

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On the set of “The Thin Man” (1934) Myrna Loy and William Powell

 

“The Thin Man” is a 1934 American comic detective film starring William Powell and Myrna Loy as Nick and Nora Charles, a flirtatious married couple who banter wittily as they solve crimes with ease. Nick is a hard-drinking retired detective and Nora a wealthy heiress. Their dog, the wire-haired fox terrier Asta, played by Skippy, was also a popular character. Completed in 1934 and nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture, the film was directed by W. S. Van Dyke from a script by Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich. The screenplay was based on the mystery novel The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett, supposedly based on his relationship with playwright Lillian Hellman. The film was such a success that it spawned five sequels: “After the Thin Man” (1936), “Another Thin Man” (1939), “Shadow of the Thin Man” (1941), “The Thin Man Goes Home” (1945), and “Song of the Thin Man” (1947).

 

James Wong Howe, Myrna Loy, W.S. Van Dyke, William Powell during filming of "The Thin Man" (1934)

James Wong Howe, Myrna Loy, W.S. Van Dyke, William Powell during filming of “The Thin Man” (1934)

 

Maureen O'Sullivan, William Powell, W.S. Van Dyke, Unknown, Myrna Loy, Ronald Colman on the set of "The Thin Man" (1934)

Maureen O’Sullivan, William Powell, W.S. Van Dyke, Unknown, Myrna Loy, Ronald Colman on the set of “The Thin Man” (1934)

 

William Powell and Myrna Loy take a break during filming of "The Thin Man" (1934)

William Powell and Myrna Loy take a break during filming of “The Thin Man” (1934)

 

William Powell, Asta, and Myrna Loy relax on the set of "The Thin Man" (1934)

William Powell, Asta, and Myrna Loy relax on the set of “The Thin Man” (1934)

 

William Powell and Myrna Loy celebrate Powell's birthday on the set of "Another Thin Man" (1939)

William Powell and Myrna Loy celebrate Powell’s birthday on the set of “Another Thin Man” (1939)

 

A party for Myrna Loy on the set of "Another Thin Man" (1939) L-R: Louis B. Mayer, Myrna Loy, William Powell and director W.S. Van Dyke

A party for Myrna Loy on the set of “Another Thin Man” (1939) L-R: Louis B. Mayer, Myrna Loy, William Powell and director W.S. Van Dyke

 

Myrna Loy and William Powell sing between scenes of "The Thin Man Goes Home" (1945)

Myrna Loy and William Powell sing between scenes of “The Thin Man Goes Home” (1945)

 

William Powell, Asta, and Myrna Loy during the shooting of "Song of the Thin Man" (1947)

William Powell, Asta, and Myrna Loy during the shooting of “Song of the Thin Man” (1947)

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Myrna Loy – A Pictorial

 

“I was a homely kid with freckles that came out every spring and stuck on me till Christmas.” ~ Myrna Loy

 

Myrna Loy

Myrna Loy

 

“Life, is not a having and a getting, but a being and a becoming.” ~ Myrna Loy

 

Myrna Loy

Myrna Loy

 

“Some perfect wife I am. I’ve been married four times, divorced four times, have no children, and can’t boil an egg.” ~ Myrna Loy referring to her perfect wife typecasting

 

Myrna Loy

Myrna Loy

 

“I was glamorous because of magicians like George Folsey, James Wong Howe, Oliver Marsh, Ray June, and all those other great cinematographers. I trusted those men and the other experts who made us beautiful. The rest of it I didn’t give a damn about. I didn’t fuss about my clothes, my lighting, or anything else, but, believe me, some of them did.” ~ Myrna Loy

 

Myrna Loy

Myrna Loy

 

“I never enjoyed my work more than when I worked with William Powell. He was a brilliant actor, a delightful companion, a great friend and above all, a true gentleman.” ~ Myrna Loy

 

Myrna Loy and William Powell in "The Thin Man" (1934 - MGM)

Myrna Loy and William Powell in “The Thin Man” (1934 – MGM)

 

“He happened to be an actor, a damned good one, and nobody knew it, least of all Clark. Oh, he wanted to be an actor, but he always deprecated his ability, pretended it didn’t matter. He was a really shy man with a terrible inferiority in there somewhere. Something was missing that kept him from doing the things he could have done.” ~ Myrna Loy

 

Myrna Loy and Clark Gable in "Parnell" (1937 - MGM)

Myrna Loy and Clark Gable in “Parnell” (1937 – MGM)

 

“I have nothing but the best to say about Doris Day. She was wonderful to me, really lovely. She sent flowers when I started and remained friendly and attentive. As I’ve said, it’s difficult when you start stepping down. You fight so hard to get to the top and then you realize it’s time to gracefully give in a little. Doris, who was riding high then, never played the prima dona. I appreciated her attitude enormously.” ~ Myrna Loy

 

Doris Day and Myrna Loy in "Midnight Lace" (1960 - Universal)

Doris Day and Myrna Loy in “Midnight Lace” (1960 – Universal)

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“Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House” – Cary Grant and Myrna Loy

 

Jim Blandings (Cary Grant):  “It’s a conspiracy, I tell you. The minute you start they put you on the all-American sucker list. You start out to build a home and wind up in the poorhouse. And if it can happen to me, what about the guys who aren’t making $15,000 a year? The ones who want a home of their own. It’s a conspiracy, I tell you, against every boy and girl who were ever in love.”

 

Theatrical Poster

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948 RKO Pictures) is a comedy starring Cary Grant and Myrna Loy. Grant and Loy play Jim and Muriel Blandings, a married couple with two daughters, who all live in a cramped New York City apartment. Muriel wants to remodel the apartment but Jim rejects the idea. After coming across an ad in the newspaper for new homes in Connecticut, the couple decides to buy and fix up an old home. Jim decides to buy an old farmhouse as a fixer up and gets bilked into purchasing “The Old Hackett Place” which is a dilapidated 200 year old farm house. The old house is declared to be structurally unsound by an engineer. Unlivable and unfixable, “The Old Hackett” place has to be torn down. The Blandings then hire an architect to design and build a new house on the site within a certain budget. Of course, this being a comedy, all kinds of problems arise with the building of a new house out in the country while working in the city. On top of that, Jim is handed the account for “Wham! Ham” at the advertising company where he works. He has to come up with a new slogan for selling “Wham! Ham!” very quickly or possibly lose his job. Also adding to the mix is Jim’s long suffering lawyer Bill Cole (played by Melvyn Douglass), who also happens to be Muriel’s high school sweetheart, with whom Muriel is still very close to. The movie also stars Reginald Denny as Mr. Simms, the architect hired to design and build the Blandings new house.

 

Cary Grant and Myrna Loy — Mr Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948)


 

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House is a great little comedy. Relaxing, easy to watch, with laughs from start to finish. Cary Grant is great as the bewildered and clueless husband-advertising executive caught up in a situation that is over his head. Myrna Loy as his loving and understanding wife is also very good. The chemistry between Grant and Loy is unmistakable and their comedic timing is delivered as only these two great stars can. Melvyn Douglas narrates the story from time to time and is very funny in his role as lawyer, friend, advisor, and ex college sweetheart. The rest of the supporting cast also adds to the comedy, as anything that can go wrong does.

 

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