Filled Under: *Silver Screen Sirens

Silver Screen Sirens: Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 – July 30, 1996) was a French-born American actress, and a Hollywood leading lady for two decades. Colbert began her career in Broadway productions during the 1920s, progressing to film with the advent of talking pictures. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress in “It Happened One Night” (1934), the first woman born outside of North America to do so, and also received Academy Award nominations for “Private Worlds” (1935) and “Since You Went Away” (1944). During her career, Colbert starred in more than sixty movies and was the industry’s biggest box-office star in 1938 and 1942. By the mid 1950s, Colbert had largely retired from the screen in favor of television and stage work, earning a Tony Award nomination for “The Marriage-Go-Round” in 1959. Her career tapered off during the early 1960s, but in the late 1970s she experienced a career resurgence in theater, earning a Sarah Siddons Award for her Chicago theater work in 1980. For her television work in “The Two Mrs. Grenvilles” (1987) she won a Golden Globe Award and received an Emmy Award nomination. In 1999, the American Film Institute voted Claudette Colbert the “12th Greatest Female American Screen Legend” in cinema. Claudette Colbert has a star on Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6812 Hollywood Blvd.

Claudette Colbert (1920)

Claudette Colbert (1920)

 

Claudette Colbert (1937)

Claudette Colbert (1937)

 

Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert

 

Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert

 

Claudette Colbert in "The Sign of the Cross" (1932)

Claudette Colbert in “The Sign of the Cross” (1932)

 

Claudette Colbert in "Maid of Salem" (1937)

Claudette Colbert in “Maid of Salem” (1937)

 

Claudette Colbert as Cleopatra in "Cleopatra" (1934)

Claudette Colbert as Cleopatra in “Cleopatra” (1934)

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Silver Screen Sirens: Ann Blyth

Ann Blyth (born August 16, 1928 in Mount Kisco, New York) is an American actress and singer, often cast in Hollywood musicals, but was also successful in dramatic roles. Most of her early roles were in musicals such as “Chip Off the Old Block” (1944), “The Merry Monahans” (1944) and “Babes on Swing Street” (1944) before appearing in the classic, Oscar-winning drama “Mildred Pierce” in 1945. Blyth’s performance as Veda Pierce, the scheming, ungrateful daughter of Joan Crawford in “Mildred Pierce” was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Blyth’s other films of note include: “Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid” (1948), “Our Very Own” (1950), “The Great Caruso” (1951), “One Minute to Zero” (1952), “The World in His Arms” (1952), “Rose Marie” (1954), “The Student Prince” (1954), “Kismet” (1955), “The Buster Keaton Story” (1957), and “The Helen Morgan Story” (1957). Ann Blyth has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6733 Hollywood Boulevard for her contribution to motion pictures.

Ann Blyth

Ann Blyth

 

Ann Blyth

Ann Blyth

 

Ann Blyth

Ann Blyth

 

Ann Blyth

Ann Blyth

 

Ann Blyth promo for "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid" (1948)

Ann Blyth promo for
“Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid” (1948)

 

Ann Blyth in "Our Very Own" (1950)

Ann Blyth in “Our Very Own” (1950)

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Silver Screen Sirens: Jennifer Jones

Jennifer Jones (March 2, 1919 – December 17, 2009) was an American Oscar-winning actress during the Hollywood golden years. Jones was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one for her role as Bernadette Soubirous in “The Song of Bernadette” (1943). She married three times, most notably to film producer David O. Selznick. Jennifer Jones starred in more than twenty films over a thirty-year career, going into semi-retirement following Selznick’s death in 1965. In later life, Jones withdrew from public life to live in quiet retirement with her son and his family in Malibu, California. She granted no interviews and rarely appeared in public. Jennifer Jones died of natural causes on Thursday, December 17, 2009, aged 90. She was cremated at the Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.

Jennifer Jones (1953 portrait)

Jennifer Jones (1953 portrait)

 

Jennifer Jones in "The Song of Bernadette" (1943). Jones won an Academy Award for her role as Bernadette Soubirious in this movie.

Jennifer Jones in “The Song of Bernadette” (1943). Jones won an Academy Award for her role as Bernadette Soubirious in this movie.

 

Jennifer Jones in "Love Letters" (1945)

Jennifer Jones in “Love Letters” (1945)

 

Jennifer Jones in "Duel In The Sun" (1947)

Jennifer Jones in “Duel In The Sun” (1947)

 

Jennifer Jones in "Madame Bovary" (1949)

Jennifer Jones in “Madame Bovary” (1949)

 

Jennifer Jones in "Love is a Many Splendored Thing" (1955)

Jennifer Jones in “Love is a Many Splendored Thing” (1955)

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Silver Screen Sirens: Katy Jurado

 

Katy Jurado 1950

Katy Jurado 1950

Katy Jurado, born María Cristina Estela Marcela Jurado García on January 16, 1924 in Mexico City, was a Mexican actress who had a successful film career both in Mexico and in Hollywood. Jurado had already established herself as an actress in Mexico in the 1940s when she came to Hollywood, becoming a regular in Western films of the 1950s and 1960s. She worked with many Hollywood legends, including Gary Cooper in “High Noon” (1952), Spencer Tracy in “Broken Lance” (1954), and Marlon Brando in “One-Eyed Jacks” (1961), and such respected directors as Fred Zinnemann (High Noon), Sam Peckinpah (The Wild Bunch and Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid) and John Huston (Under the Volcano). Jurado made seventy-one films during her career. She became the first Latin American actress nominated for an Academy Award, as Best Supporting Actress for her work in 1954’s Broken Lance, and was the first to win a Golden Globe Award. Like many Latin actors, she was typecast to play ethnic roles in American films. By contrast, she had a greater variety of roles in Mexican films. Jurado was one of very few Mexican actresses to succeed in Hollywood. Others are Dolores del Río, Lupe Vélez, and Salma Hayek. Jurado died of kidney failure and pulmonary disease on July 5, 2002, at the age of 78, at her home in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. She was buried in Cuernavaca, Mexico, at the Panteón de la Páz cemetery.

 

Katy Jurado

Katy Jurado

 

Katy Jurado and Marlon Brando at an Awards ceremony. ca.1955

Katy Jurado and Marlon Brando at an Awards ceremony. ca.1955

 

Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado, Gary Cooper, and Grace Kelly from "High Noon" (1952)

Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado, Gary Cooper, and Grace Kelly from “High Noon” (1952)

 

Alan Ladd, Katy Jurado, and Ernest Borgnine on the set of "The Badlanders" (1958)

Alan Ladd, Katy Jurado, and Ernest Borgnine on the set of “The Badlanders” (1958)

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Silver Screen Sirens: Loretta Young

 

Loretta Young (January 6, 1913 – August 12, 2000) was an American actress. Starting as a child actress, she had a long and varied career in film from 1917 to 1953. She won the 1948 best actress Academy Award for her role in the 1947 film “The Farmer’s Daughter”, and received an Oscar nomination for her role in “Come to the Stable”, in 1949. Young moved to the relatively new medium of television, where she had a dramatic anthology series, “The Loretta Young Show”, from 1953 to 1961. The series earned three Emmy Awards, and reran successfully on daytime TV and later in syndication. Young, a devout Roman Catholic, worked with various Catholic charities after her acting career. Young has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. One for motion pictures, at 6104 Hollywood Boulevard, and another for television, at 6141 Hollywood Boulevard. In 2011, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars was dedicated to her.

Loretta Young 1929

 

Loretta Young

 

Loretta Young

 

Loretta Young

 

Loretta Young

 

Loretta Young

 

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