Posts Tagged ‘Bette Davis’

Humphrey Bogart – A Pictorial

 

“I have absolutely no interest in who gets the girl. I don’t care. I don’t see any reason to spend two hours to see who gets the girl especially since you know who’s going to get her from the beginning, usually the actor who gets the most money.” ~ Humphrey Bogart

 

Humphrey Bogart

Humphrey Bogart

 

“She’s a real Joe. You’ll fall in love with her like everybody else.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Lauren Bacall

 

Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart laughing on set between takes of the Producer's Showcase live telecast of The Petrified Forest (1955).

Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart laughing on set between takes of the Producer’s Showcase live telecast of The Petrified Forest (1955).

 

“I didn’t do anything I’ve never done before, but when the camera moves in on that Bergman face, and she’s saying she loves you, it would make anybody feel romantic.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Ingrid Bergman

 

Humphrey Bogart with Ingrid Bergman in "Casablanca" (1942)

Humphrey Bogart with Ingrid Bergman in “Casablanca” (1942)

 

“Even when I was carrying a gun, she scared the bejesus out of me.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Bette Davis

 

Humphrey Bogart with Bette Davis in "Dark Victory" (1939)

Humphrey Bogart with Bette Davis in “Dark Victory” (1939)

 

“She talks at you as though you were a microphone. She lectured the hell out of me on temperance and the evils of drink. She doesn’t give a damn how she looks. I don’t think she tries to be a character. I think she is one.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Katharine Hepburn

 

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn at a press reception at Claridges in Mayfair, London (1951)

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn at a press reception at Claridges in Mayfair, London (1951)

 

“You could argue with her, but she was tough. When Jack (cinematographer Jack Cardiff) saw her striding into the jungle alone one morning, he thought, ‘God help the jungle’.” ~ Humphrey Bogart on Katharine Hepburn during the filming of “The African Queen” (1951)

 

Humphrey Bogart with Katharine Hepburn in "The African Queen" (1952)

Humphrey Bogart with Katharine Hepburn in “The African Queen” (1952)

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George Brent — A popular leading man during the 1930s and 40s.

 

George Brent was a Irish born film actor in American cinema who became a popular leading man in Hollywood during the late 1930s and 1940s.

George Brent (March 15, 1899 – May 26, 1979)

George Brent
(March 15, 1899 – May 26, 1979)

 

George Brent was born George Brendan Nolan on March 15, 1899 in Raharabeg, County Roscommon, Ireland. The son of a British Army officer, Brent was part of an IRA Active Service Unit during the Irish War of Independence (1919–1922). He became a courier for Sinn Fein leader Michael Collins. With a price on his head and being hunted by the Black and Tan, Brent fled. Having an interest in acting, Brent joined a touring production of “Abie’s Irish Rose” and came to the United States in 1925 with the company to tour with the show. During the next five years, Brent acted in stock companies in Colorado, Rhode Island, Florida, and Massachusetts. In 1927, he appeared on “Broadway in Love, Honor, and Betray” alongside Clark Gable. Brent eventually made his way to Hollywood and made his first film, “Under Suspicion” in 1930. Over the next two years he appeared in a number of minor films produced by Universal Studios and Fox, before being signed to contract by Warner Brothers in 1932. He would remain at Warner Brothers for the next twenty years, carving out a successful career as a top-flight leading man during the late 1930s and 1940s starring opposite many of the most famous and popular leading ladies of that era.

 

George Brent at home

George Brent at home

Highly regarded by Bette Davis, George Brent became her most frequent male co-star, appearing with her in eleven films, including “Front Page Woman” (1935), “Special Agent” (1935), “The Golden Arrow” (1936), “Jezebel” (1938), “The Old Maid” (1939), “Dark Victory” (1939) and “The Great Lie” (1941). Brent also played opposite Ruby Keeler in “42nd Street” (1933), Kay Francis in “The Keyhole” (1933), Greta Garbo in “The Painted Veil” (1934), Ginger Rogers in “In Person” (1935), Madeleine Carroll in “The Case Against Mrs. Ames” (1936), Jean Arthur in “More Than a Secretary” (1936), Myrna Loy in “Stamboul Quest” (1934) and “The Rains Came” (1939), Merle Oberon in “‘Til We Meet Again” (1940), Ann Sheridan in “Honeymoon for Three” (1941), Joan Fontaine in “The Affairs of Susan” (1945), Barbara Stanwyck in “So Big!” (1932), “The Purchase Price” (1932), “Baby Face” (1933), “The Gay Sisters” (1942) and “My Reputation” (1946), Claudette Colbert in “Tomorrow Is Forever” (1946), Dorothy McGuire in “The Spiral Staircase” (1946), Lucille Ball in “Lover Come Back” (1946) and Yvonne De Carlo in “Slave Girl” (1947).

 

George Brent with Bette Davis in "Jezebel" (1938)

George Brent with Bette Davis in “Jezebel” (1938)

Brent’s popularity began to wane in the late 1940s and after making several “B” pictures over the next few years he retired from film in 1953. Brent was cast in the lead in the 1956 television series, “Wire Service” which ran for thirteen episodes in 1957. Through 1960,  he also appeared on other television shows such as “Crown Theatre with Gloria Swanson” (1954), “The Ford Television Theatre” (1953 and 1954), “Climax!” (1955), “Fireside Theatre” (1955), “Crossroads” (1956), and “Rawhide” (1960) to name a few. After appearing in “The Chevy Mystery Show” in 1960, Brent retired until making one last appearance in 1978 in the made-for-television production “Born Again”.

 

George Brent with Kay Francis in "The Keyhole" (1933)

George Brent with Kay Francis in “The Keyhole” (1933)

George Brent was known as a womanizer in Hollywood, reputedly carrying on a lengthy relationship with his frequent co-star Bette Davis. He was married five times: to Helen Louise Campbell (1925–1927), to actress Ruth Chatterton (1932–1934), actress Constance Worth (1937) and actress Ann Sheridan (1942–1943). Brent’s final marriage was in 1947 to Janet Michaels, a former model and dress designer. That union lasted 27 years until her death in 1974. They had two children together, a son and a daughter.

 

George Brent 1935

George Brent 1935

 

George Brent died from emphysema on May 26, 1979 in Solana Beach, San Diego County, California. He was eighty years old.
Brent earned two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The first at 1709 Vine St. for his film contributions. The second star is at 1614 Vine St. for his work in television.

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Henry Fonda – A Pictorial

 

“I’m not really Henry Fonda. Nobody could have that much integrity.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda

 

“I’m not that pristine pure, I guess I’ve broken as many rules as the next feller. But I reckon my face looks honest enough and if people buy it, Hallelujah.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda in "Young Mr. Lincoln" (1939)

 

“If there is something in my eyes, a kind of honesty in the face, then I guess you could say that’s the man I’d like to be, the man I want to be.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Jane Danwell in "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940)

 

“I don’t really like myself. Never did. People mix me up with the characters I play. I’m not a great guy like Doug Roberts (in ‘Mister Roberts’). I’d like to be but I’m not.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Barbara Stanwyck in "The Lady Eve" (1941)

 

“Money must be, I guess, what first took me to Hollywood. When I first came out, I certainly had NO ambition to make pictures.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Cathy Downs in "My Darling Clementine" (1946)

 

“I look like my father. To this day, when I walk past a mirror and see my reflection in it, my first impression is: That’s my father. There is a strong Fonda look.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda in "12 Angry Men" (1957)

 

“I’ve been close to Bette Davis for thirty-eight years… and I have the cigarette burns to prove it.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

Henry Fonda and Bette Davis in "Jezebel" (1938)

 

“My thinking was scrambled when Sullivan and I separated. Something happened to me that had never happend before. I couldn’t cope. It was heartbreak time. I thought it was the end of the world.” ~ Henry Fonda on his divorce from first wife Margaret Sullavan

 

Henry Fonda and Margaret Sullavan in "The Moon's Our Home" (1936)

 

“It has to do with the fact that Ford, for all his greatness, is an Irish egomaniac, as anyone who knows him will say.” ~ Henry Fonda

 

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Celeste Holm

 

“I hated that. It’s stereotyped. I only played that kind of role in two pictures and that was enough, thank you. It’s not me.” ~  Celeste Holm on her wisecracking smart girl image.

 

Celeste Holm is an American stage, film, and television actress, known for her Academy Award-winning performance in “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), as well as for her Oscar-nominated performances in “Come to the Stable” (1949) and “All About Eve” (1950).

 

Celeste Holm

Holm was born April 29, 1917 in New York City. She grew up as an only child. Her mother, Jean Parke, was an American portrait artist and author and her father, Theodor Holm, was a Norwegian businessman whose company provided marine adjustment services for Lloyd’s of London. Because of her parents’ occupations, she traveled often during her youth and attended various schools in Holland, France and the United States. She graduated from University High School for Girls in Chicago, where she performed in many school stage productions. She then studied drama at the University of Chicago before becoming a stage actress in the late 1930s. Holm’s first professional theatrical role was in a production of “Hamlet” starring Leslie Howard and her first major Broadway part was as Mary L. in William Saroyan’s 1940 revival of “The Time of Your Life” co-starring fellow newcomer Gene Kelly. The role that got her the most recognition from critics and audiences was as Ado Annie in the flagship Broadway production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!” in 1943. After she starred in the Broadway production of “Bloomer Girl”,  20th Century Fox signed Holm to a movie contract in 1946 and she appeared in her first film “Three Little Girls in Blue”. With her third film “Gentlemen’s Agreement” (1947), Holm would win an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. She would be nominated twice more for Academy Awards in the “Come to the Stable” (1949) and “All About Eve” (1950). Holme preferred live theatre to film so she left Hollywood after making “All About Eve” to return to the stage. She made only two movies in the fifties; the MGM musicals “The Tender Trap” in 1955 with Frank Sinatra and Debbie Reynolds and “High Society” in 1956 with Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly, and Frank Sinatra.

 

Celeste Holm with director John Stahl at the Mocambo nightclub after winning her Oscar March 20, 1948 .

 

During the 1950’s, Celeste also appeared in her own television series “Honestly Celeste” (1954) and as a panelist on “Who Pays?” (1959) among other television appearances. For the next three decades, she would appear on television in regular series, mini series, and movies. Among her many television appearances during this time are: In 1965, she played the Fairy Godmother alongside Lesley Ann Warren in the CBS production of “Cinderella”; In 1970-71, she was featured on the NBC sitcom “Nancy”, with Renne Jarrett, John Fink, and Robert F. Simon; and in 1979, she played the role of First Lady Florence Harding in the television mini-series, “Backstairs at the White House”. Holm also appeared in many television series such as “Columbo”, “The Eleventh Hour”, “Archie Bunker’s Place”, “Magnum P.I.”, “Cheers”, and “Falcon Crest” and was a regular on the ABC soap opera “Loving”. She last appeared on television in the CBS television series Promised Land (1996–99). During the 1970s and 1980s, Holm did more screen acting, with roles in films such as “Tom Sawyer” (1973) and “Three Men and a Baby” (1987). In 2005 Holm appeared in “Alchemy” and in 2011, despite health ailments, she completed filming the comedy feature film, “College Debts”, directed by Dexter Warr and Joshua Zilm.

 

Bette Davis and Celeste Holm in "All About Eve" (1950)

 

Celeste Holms has been married five times. The first marriage was to Ralph Nelson in 1936. They had one son together. The marriage ended in divorce in 1939. Holm next married Francis Emerson Harding Davies, an English auditor, on January 7, 1940. Davies was a Roman Catholic, and Holm was received into the Roman Catholic Church for the purposes of their 1940 wedding. The marriage was dissolved on May 8, 1945. From 1946-52, Holm was married to airline public relations executive A. Schuyler Dunning, with whom she had a second son, businessman Daniel Dunning. Holm then married fellow thespian Wesley Addy in 1961. They remained married until his death in 1996. On April 29, 2004, her 87th birthday, Holm married opera singer Frank Basile, age 41. They are still married and currently living at their co-op on Central Park West in New York City.

 

Grace Kelly, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, and Celeste Holm in "High Society" (1956)

 

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Beach Beauties: Joan Blondell, Bette Davis, Gloria Grahame, Cyd Charisse

 

Beach Beauties – Joan, Bette, Gloria, and Cyd

 

Joan Blondell and Bette Davis

 

Gloria Grahame and Cyd Charisse

 

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