Posts Tagged ‘Buster Keaton’

Anne Cornwall appeared in many silent films

 

Anne Cornwall was an American actress who performed for forty years in many silent film productions starting in 1918 and later in talkies until 1959.

 

Anne Cornwall (January 17, 1897 – March 2, 1980)

Anne Cornwall
(January 17, 1897 – March 2, 1980)

Cornwall was born in Brooklyn, New York on January 17, 1897. She made her film debut in 1918 with a bit role in the silent film “The Knife” and was one of the thirteen Wampas Baby Stars of 1925. The brunette actress went on to appear in fifty seven films during her career, alternating between dramatic performances (most often in westerns) and with turns as baby-faced, wide-eyed leading ladies in comedies. Her best remembered roles were opposite Buster Keaton in “College” (1927) and as one of the two flappers in Laurel & Hardy’s two-reeler “Men O’War” (1929). After 1930 most of her roles were minor and often uncredited. Cornwall briefly reappeared before the public eye in 1957, when she made the personal-appearance rounds with her old co-star Buster Keaton on the occasion of the Paramount biopic “The Buster Keaton Story” (1957).

 

Anne Cornwall performed for forty years in many silent film productions starting in 1918

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall was married twice. First to writer/director Charles Maigne, then later to Los Angeles engineer Ellis Wing Taylor, who fathered her only child, Peter Taylor.

 

Anne Cornwall

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall died on March 2, 1980 in Van Nuys, California, USA.

 

Anne Cornwall

Anne Cornwall

 

Anne Cornwall with Buster Keaton in “College” (1927)

Anne Cornwall with Buster Keaton
in “College” (1927)

 

Anne Cornwall (second from left) with Gloria Greer, Oliver Hardy and Stan Laurel in Men O' War (1929)

Anne Cornwall (second from left) with Gloria Greer, Oliver Hardy and Stan Laurel in Men O’ War (1929)

 

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Phyllis Haver was a popular actress of the silent film era.

Phyllis Haver (January 6, 1899 – November 19, 1960) was an American actress of the silent film era.

 

Phyllis Haver was a popular silent film actress.

Phyllis Haver

Haver was born January 6, 1899 in Douglass, Kansas. When she was a child her family moved to Los Angeles, California, then a city of less than half a million people. Haver attended Los Angeles Polytechnic High. After graduating, she played piano to accompany the new silent films in local theaters.
Producer Mack Sennett saw her and hired her to be one of his “Sennett Bathing Beauties”. Between 1916-20 she appeared in more than thirty five short films for Sennett Studios. With her curvy figure and blonde hair she quickly became one of the most popular of Sennett’s bathing beauties.

Haver appeared in “The Balloonatic” (1923) a short starring Buster Keaton. She co-starred with Olive Borden in “Fig Leaves” (1926) and with Victor McLaglen in “What Price Glory” (1926). Haver won rave reviews for her performances as Roxie Hart in Cecil B DeMille’s “Chicago” (1927) opposite Hungarian film actor Victor Varconi. One reviewer called her performance “astoundingly fine,” and added that Haver “makes this combination of tragedy and comedy a most entertaining piece of work.” She also performed in the comedy film “The Battle of the Sexes” (1928) and appeared with Lon Chaney in his last silent film, “Thunder” (1929).

 

Phyllis Haver as one of Mack Sennet's beach beauties in 1917.  (photographed by Mack Sennett)

Phyllis Haver as one of Mack Sennet’s beach beauties in 1917. (photographed by Mack Sennett)


 

In 1929, Haver married millionaire William Seeman with a service performed by New York Mayor James J. Walker at the home of Rube Goldberg, the cartoonist. They moved into a penthouse in New York City and Haver retired from acting. She said she loved being a wife and never wanted to return to Hollywood. Unfortunately after sixteen years of marriage Haver and Seeman divorced in 1945. The couple had no children.

 

Phyllis Haver with husband William Seeman

Phyllis Haver with husband William Seeman


 

When Haver married Seeman in 1929, she was still under contract to Cecil B. DeMille. Haver told DeMille she was ending her contract with him under the “Act of God” clause. Stunned, DeMille asked, “What Act of God?” Haver replied, “If marrying a millionaire isn’t an Act of God, I don’t know what is.” DeMille let her go.

 

Phyllis Haver

Phyllis Haver


 

Haver lived her later years in relative comfort in Sharon, Connecticut, but as she grew older she became more reclusive. She lived in a large house and rarely had visitors. Her only companion was her longtime housekeeper. Haver reportedly made several suicide attempts and was devastated when her former boss and good friend Mack Sennett  died.

 

Phyllis Haver and Julia Faye in "Chicago" (1927)

Phyllis Haver and Julia Faye in “Chicago” (1927)


 

On November 19, 1960, just fourteen days after Sennetts death, 61-year-old Phyllis Haver died from an overdose of barbiturates, a suspected suicide. She was found by her housekeeper in her bed, fully dressed and wearing make-up. Haver was buried at Grassy Hills Cemetery in Falls Village, CT.

 

Phyllis Haver and Buster Keaton in "The Balloonatic" (1923)

Phyllis Haver and Buster Keaton in
“The Balloonatic” (1923)


 
Olive Borden and Phyllis Haver in "Fig Leaves" (1926)

Olive Borden and Phyllis Haver in “Fig Leaves” (1926)


 
Phyllis Haver with Jean Hersholt in D.W. Griffith's "The Battle of the Sexes" (1928)

Phyllis Haver with Jean Hersholt in D.W. Griffith’s
“The Battle of the Sexes” (1928)


 
Phyllis Haver with Margaret Livingston in "The Office Scandal" (1929)

Phyllis Haver with Margaret Livingston in
“The Office Scandal” (1929)


 

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Buster Keaton – A Pictorial

 

“Not long ago a friend asked me what was the greatest pleasure I got from spending my whole life as an actor. There have been so many that I had to think about that for a moment. Then I said, ‘Like everyone else, I like to be with a happy crowd’.” ~ Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton with his sons James (b.1922) and Robert (b.1924)

 

“All my life I have been happiest when the folks watching me said to each other, ‘Look at the poor dope, wilya?'”. ~ Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton lounging on his convertable

 

“Is Hollywood the cruelest city in the world? Well, it can be. New York can be like that, too. You can be a Broadway star here one night, and something happens, and then you’re out… nobody knows you on the street. They forget you ever lived. It happens in Hollywood, too.” ~ Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton with Conchita Montenegro

 

“They say pantomime’s a lost art. It’s never been a lost art and never will be, because it’s too natural to do.” ~ Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton and Viola Dane

 

“What really got my goat at MGM were comedians like The Marx Brothers who never wrote their own jokes.” ~ Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton and 'friends'

 

“Charlie’s tramp was a bum with a bum’s philosophy. Lovable as he was, he would steal if he got the chance. My little fellow was a working man and honest.” ~ Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton and Jackie Cooper

“Silence is of the gods; only monkeys chatter.” ~ Buster Keaton

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