Posts Tagged ‘Claudette Colbert’

Rochelle Hudson acting career spanned four decades

 

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson, born March 6, 1916 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma was a film and television actress whose career spanned four decades from the 1930s through the 1960s. She was named a WAMPAS Baby Star in 1931 along with future Hollywood stars Joan Blondell, Constance Cummings, Frances Dee, and Anita Louise. Hudson may be best remembered today for costarring in “Wild Boys of the Road” (1933), playing Cosette in “Les Miserables” (1935), as the older sister of Shirley Temple’s character in “Curly Top” (1935), and for playing Natalie Wood’s mother in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955). Other notable roles for Hudson include; Sally Glynn the fallen ingenue in “She Done Him Wrong” (1933) starring Cary Grant and Mae West; Richard Cromwell’s love interest in the Will Rogers showcase “Life Begins at Forty” (1935); “Way Down East” (1935) with Henry Fonda; the daughter of carnival barker W.C. Fields in “Poppy” (1936); and Claudette Colbert’s adult daughter in “Imitation of Life” (1934).

 

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson


 

In the 1954–1955 television season, Hudson co-starred with Gil Stratton and Eddie Mayehoff in the CBS situation comedy “That’s My Boy”, based on the 1951 Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin film of the same name. Other television credits include appearing on Racket Squad in 1951, Schlitz Playhouse in 1952, Shower of Stars in 1954, Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre in 1955, and Branded in 1965.

 

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in "Way Down East" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in
“Way Down East” (1935)


 

Hudson was married four times. Her first husband was Charles Brust. Little is known of the marriage other than it ended in divorce. She remarried in 1939 to Harold Thompson, who was the head of the Storyline Department at Disney Studios. She assisted Thompson, who was doing espionage work in Mexico as a civilian during World War II. They posed as a vacationing couple to various parts of Mexico, to detect if there was any German activity in these areas. One of their more successful vacations uncovered a supply of high test aviation gas hidden by German agents in Baja California. After their divorce in 1947, Hudson married a third time the following year to Los Angeles Times sportswriter, Dick Irving Hyland. The marriage lasted two years before the couple divorced. Her final marriage was to Robert Mindell, a hotel executive. The couple remained together for eight years before they divorced in 1971.

 

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in "Imitation of Life" (1934)

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in
“Imitation of Life” (1934)


 

On January 17, 1972, Hudson was found dead in her home at the Palm Desert Country Club. A business associate with whom she had been working in real estate discovered her body on her bathroom floor. Hudson had died of a heart attack brought on by a liver ailment. Her only close survivor was her mother.

 

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in "Poppy" (1936)

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in
“Poppy” (1936)

 

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in "Curly Top" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in
“Curly Top” (1935)

 

Rochelle Hudson - Bathing Beauty -  ca.1940s

Rochelle Hudson

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Silver Screen Sirens: Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 – July 30, 1996) was a French-born American actress, and a Hollywood leading lady for two decades. Colbert began her career in Broadway productions during the 1920s, progressing to film with the advent of talking pictures. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress in “It Happened One Night” (1934), the first woman born outside of North America to do so, and also received Academy Award nominations for “Private Worlds” (1935) and “Since You Went Away” (1944). During her career, Colbert starred in more than sixty movies and was the industry’s biggest box-office star in 1938 and 1942. By the mid 1950s, Colbert had largely retired from the screen in favor of television and stage work, earning a Tony Award nomination for “The Marriage-Go-Round” in 1959. Her career tapered off during the early 1960s, but in the late 1970s she experienced a career resurgence in theater, earning a Sarah Siddons Award for her Chicago theater work in 1980. For her television work in “The Two Mrs. Grenvilles” (1987) she won a Golden Globe Award and received an Emmy Award nomination. In 1999, the American Film Institute voted Claudette Colbert the “12th Greatest Female American Screen Legend” in cinema. Claudette Colbert has a star on Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6812 Hollywood Blvd.

Claudette Colbert (1920)

Claudette Colbert (1920)

 

Claudette Colbert (1937)

Claudette Colbert (1937)

 

Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert

 

Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert

 

Claudette Colbert in "The Sign of the Cross" (1932)

Claudette Colbert in “The Sign of the Cross” (1932)

 

Claudette Colbert in "Maid of Salem" (1937)

Claudette Colbert in “Maid of Salem” (1937)

 

Claudette Colbert as Cleopatra in "Cleopatra" (1934)

Claudette Colbert as Cleopatra in “Cleopatra” (1934)

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

“It Happened One Night” Sweeps the 1934 Academy Awards

 

At the 7th Academy Awards for 1934, held on February 27, 1935 at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California, Frank Capra’s romantic comedy “It Happened One Night” became the first film to perform a “clean sweep” of the top five categories; Best Picture, Best Director (Frank Capra), Best Actor (Clark Gable), Best Actress (Claudette Colbert) and Best Screenplay (Robert Riskin).

 

“It Happened One Night” (1934 – Columbia Pictures) won the Oscar for Best Picture

 

“It Happened One Night” (1934) is an American romantic comedy directed by Frank Capra, in which a pampered socialite (Claudette Colbert) tries to get out from under her father’s thumb, and falls in love with a roguish reporter (Clark Gable).

 

Frank Capra with his Oscar for best director for “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

Clark Gable gave his Oscar for “It Happened One Night” to a child who admired it, telling him it was the winning of the statue that had mattered, not owning it. The child returned the Oscar to the Gable family after Clark’s death.

 

Clark Gable with his Oscar for Best Actor in “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

Claudette Colbert was so convinced that she would lose the Oscar competition to write-in nominee Bette Davis, that she decided not to attend the awards ceremony. When Colbert won the Academy Award for Best Actress she was summoned from a train station to pick up her Oscar.

 

Shirley Temple gives Claudette Colbert her Oscar for Best Actress in “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

Robert Riskin won the Oscar for Best Screenplay for “It Happened One Night” (1934)

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Claudette Colbert – A Pictorial

 

“I know what’s best for me, after all I have been in the Claudette Colbert business longer than anybody.” ~ Claudette Colbert

 

Claudette Colbert


 
“I’ve always believed that acting is instinct to start with… you either have it or you don’t.” ~ Claudette Colbert
 

Claudette Colbert


 
“Most of us don’t know about happiness until it’s over.” ~ Claudette Colbert
 

Claudette Colbert


 
“Audiences always sound like they’re glad to see me, and I’m damned glad to see them. If they want you, you want to do it.” ~ Claudette Colbert
 

Claudette Colbert


 
“It matters more what’s in a woman’s face than what’s on it.” ~ Claudette Colbert
 

Claudette Colbert


 
“If I couldn’t laugh, I’d rather die.” ~ Claudette Colbert

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr