Posts Tagged ‘Debbie Reynolds’

Debbie Reynolds — Happy Valentine’s Day,1950

              Debbie Reynolds wishing everyone a
                    Happy Valentine’s Day (1950)

Debbie Reynolds wishing everyone a happy Valentine's Day, 1950.

Debbie Reynolds wishing everyone a
Happy Valentine’s Day, 1950.

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Happy Birthday Jane Powell and Debbie Reynolds

 

Happy Birthday Jane Powell and Debbie Reynolds

 

Actresses, singers, dancers, entertainers, and good friends Jane Powell and Debbie Reynolds were born on the same day three years apart. Jane Powell was born April 1, 1929 and Debbie Reynolds was born April 1, 1932. Both signed as teenagers with different studios, Powell with MGM and Reynolds with Warner Brothers. After Warner Brothers didn’t resign Reynolds, she signed with MGM and by the mid-1950s was a major star. Some of her films of note were “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952), “Tammy and the Bachelor” (1957), and “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” (1964). Powell also had great success with MGM, starring in classic musicals such as “Royal Wedding” (1951), with Fred Astaire, “A Date with Judy” (1948), with friend Elizabeth Taylor, and “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” (1954), with Howard Keel. The two beautiful and talented stars appeared in three movies together “Two Weeks With Love” (1950), “Athena” (1954), and “Hit the Deck” (1955). After their movie careers slowed, Jane Powell and Debbie Reynolds both went on to enjoy successful stage and television careers.

Jane Powell born April 1, 1929.

Jane Powell
born April 1, 1929

 

Debbie Reynolds born April 1, 1932

Debbie Reynolds
born April 1, 1932

 

Ann Miller, Debbie Reynolds, and Jane Powell in "Hit the Deck" (1955)

Ann Miller, Debbie Reynolds, and Jane Powell in “Hit the Deck” (1955)

 

Debbie Reynolds and Jane Powell share April 1st Birthdays

Debbie Reynolds and Jane Powell share April 1st Birthdays

 

Jane Powell and Debbie Reynolds, both born April 1st, celebrate their birthdays on the set of "Two Weeks With Love" (1950) with costars Louis Calhern, Tommy Rettig, Gary Gray and Ann Harding.

Jane Powell and Debbie Reynolds, both born April 1st, celebrate their birthdays on the set of “Two Weeks With Love” (1950) with costars Louis Calhern, Tommy Rettig, Gary Gray and Ann Harding.

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Debbie Reynolds – A Pictorial

 
“I stopped making movies because I don’t like taking my clothes off. Maybe it’s realism but, in my opinion, it`s utter filth.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds


 

“I think one of my favourite films is ‘Dark Victory’ with Bette Davis. Why? She was so wonderful in that film. And maybe I just want a good cry once in a while without having to go through a divorce.” ~ Debbie Reynolds when asked what her favourite movie was.
 

Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds


 

“I miss the movies. Still, I understood that my kind of movie has had its day. I thought it was over for me.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds


 

“I gave it all that I had, and it’s gratifying that others seem to be receiving it so well.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, and Gene Kelly in "Singin' In The Rain" (1952)

Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds, and Gene Kelly in “Singin’ In The Rain” (1952)


 

“‘Singin` in the Rain’ (1952) and childbirth were the two hardest things I ever had to do in my life.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Elizabeth Taylor, Eddie Fisher, and Debbie Reynolds in Las Vegas in 1958

Elizabeth Taylor, Eddie Fisher, and Debbie Reynolds in Las Vegas in 1958


 

“I do twenty minutes every time the refrigerator door opens and the light comes on.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

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Paw Pix: Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds with her canine friends!!

Debbie Reynolds

 

Debbie Reynolds

 

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Donald O’Connor – An American dancer, singer, and film actor

 

“I was born and raised to entertain other people. I’ve heard laughter and applause and known a lot of sorrow. Everything about me is based on show business – I think it will bring me happiness. I hope so.” – Donald O’Connor in 1955

 

Donald O’Connor was an American dancer, singer, and actor who came to fame in a series of movies in which he co-starred alternately with Gloria Jean, Peggy Ryan, and Francis the Talking Mule. He is best remembered today for his role as Gene Kelly’s friend and colleague in “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952).

 

Donald O'Connor  (August 28, 1925 – September 27, 2003)

Donald O’Connor
(August 28, 1925 – September 27, 2003)

Donald O’Connor was born August 28, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois. His parents were Irish-American vaudeville entertainers. When O’Connor was only a few years old, he and his sister Arlene were in a car crash outside a theater in Hartford, Connecticut. O’Connor survived, but his sister was killed. Several weeks later, his father died of a heart attack while dancing on stage in Brockton, Massachusetts. O’Connor began performing in movies in 1937. He appeared opposite Bing Crosby in “Sing, You Sinners” (1938) at age 12. Paramount Pictures used him in both A and B films, including “Tom Sawyer, Detective” (1938) and “Beau Geste” (1939). In 1940, when he had outgrown child roles, he returned to vaudeville. In 1942 O’Connor joined Universal Pictures where he played roles in four of the Gloria Jean musicals, and achieved stardom with “Mister Big” (1943). In 1944 O’connor was drafted into the Army. Before he reported for induction, Universal Pictures rushed him through three feature films, done simultaneously and released when he was overseas. After his discharge, Universal cast him in lightweight musicals and comedies. In 1949, O’Connor played the lead role in “Francis”, the story of a soldier befriended by a talking mule. The film was such a huge success that he made one Francis movie a year until 1955. In what is his most famous role, O’Connor starred opposite Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds in “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952) . His role as Cosmo the piano player in “Singin’ In The Rain” earned him a Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Comedy or Musical. He also starred opposite Marilyn Monroe and Ethel Meriman in “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954).

 

Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Kelly in "Singin' In The Rain" (1952)

Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Kelly in “Singin’ In The Rain” (1952)

 

Donald O’Connor was a regular host of NBC’s “Colgate Comedy Hour”. He hosted a color television special on NBC in 1957 and he had his own television series in the late 1960s.  After overcoming alcoholism in the 1970s, he got a career boost when he hosted the Academy Awards, which earned him two Primetime Emmy nominations. He appeared as a gaslight-era entertainer in the 1981 film “Ragtime”, notable for similar encore performances by James Cagney and Pat O’Brien. O’Connor appeared in the short-lived “Bring Back Birdie” on Broadway in 1981, and continued to make film and television appearances into the 1990s. Donald O’Connor’s last feature film was the Jack Lemmon-Walter Matthau comedy “Out to Sea” (1997). O’Connor was still making public appearances well into 2003.

 

Donald O'Connor and Marilyn Monroe in "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Donald O’Connor and Marilyn Monroe in “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

O’Connor was married twice. In 1944 he married Gwen Carter. They had one child and were divorced in 1954. He married Gloria Noble in 1956 and they remained married until his death in 2003. Donald and Gloria had three children.

 

Donald O'Connor in "Francis" (1950)

Donald O’Connor in “Francis” (1950)

 

Donald O’Connor died from congestive heart failure on September 27, 2003 in Calabasas, California. He was 78 years old. As some of his last words O’Connor is reported to have expressed tongue-in-cheek thanks to the Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement that he expected to receive at a “future date”. His remains were cremated and buried at the Forest Lawn–Hollywood Hills Cemetery in Los Angeles. He is survived by his wife, Gloria, and four children.

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