Posts Tagged ‘Donald O’Connor’

On the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

On the set of
“There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

“There’s No Business Like Show Business” is a 1954 20th Century-Fox musical-comedy-drama starring Ethel Merman, Dan Dailey, Donald O’Connor, Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Richard Eastham, and Johnnie Ray. The film was directed by Walter Lang and written by Lamar Trotti (story) and Phoebe Ephron and Henry Ephron with music by Irving Berlin. “There’s No Business Like Show Business” was filmed in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color.

 

Director Walter Lang and Mitzi Gaynor on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Director Walter Lang and Mitzi Gaynor on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Irving Berlin visits with Marilyn Monroe on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Irving Berlin visits with Marilyn Monroe on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Ethel Merman visits with Ceasar Romero on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Ethel Merman visits with Ceasar Romero on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Johnnie Ray and director Walter Lang on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Johnnie Ray and director Walter Lang on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe and Donald O’Connor on the set of "There’s No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe and Donald O’Connor on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Ethel Merman and Dan Dailey relax on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Mitzi Gaynor, Marilyn Monroe, Ethel Merman and Dan Dailey relax on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Johnnie Ray, Mitzi Gaynor, Dan Dailey, Ethel Merman, Donald O´Connor and Marilyn Monroe preparing for the big number on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Johnnie Ray, Mitzi Gaynor, Dan Dailey, Ethel Merman, Donald O´Connor and Marilyn Monroe preparing for the big number on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe gets hair and make-up touch ups on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe gets hair and make-up touch ups on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe  on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe relaxes between scenes on the set of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe relaxes between scenes on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe outside her trailer during the filming of "There’s No Business Like Show Business"  (1954)

Marilyn Monroe outside her trailer during the filming of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Marilyn Monroe wardrobe fitting and photo for "There’s No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Marilyn Monroe wardrobe fitting and photo for “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Donald O'Connor and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Donald O’Connor and Marilyn Monroe at the premiere of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Debbie Reynolds – A Pictorial

 
“I stopped making movies because I don’t like taking my clothes off. Maybe it’s realism but, in my opinion, it`s utter filth.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds


 

“I think one of my favourite films is ‘Dark Victory’ with Bette Davis. Why? She was so wonderful in that film. And maybe I just want a good cry once in a while without having to go through a divorce.” ~ Debbie Reynolds when asked what her favourite movie was.
 

Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds


 

“I miss the movies. Still, I understood that my kind of movie has had its day. I thought it was over for me.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds


 

“I gave it all that I had, and it’s gratifying that others seem to be receiving it so well.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, and Gene Kelly in "Singin' In The Rain" (1952)

Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds, and Gene Kelly in “Singin’ In The Rain” (1952)


 

“‘Singin` in the Rain’ (1952) and childbirth were the two hardest things I ever had to do in my life.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Elizabeth Taylor, Eddie Fisher, and Debbie Reynolds in Las Vegas in 1958

Elizabeth Taylor, Eddie Fisher, and Debbie Reynolds in Las Vegas in 1958


 

“I do twenty minutes every time the refrigerator door opens and the light comes on.” ~ Debbie Reynolds
 

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Donald O’Connor – An American dancer, singer, and film actor

 

“I was born and raised to entertain other people. I’ve heard laughter and applause and known a lot of sorrow. Everything about me is based on show business – I think it will bring me happiness. I hope so.” – Donald O’Connor in 1955

 

Donald O’Connor was an American dancer, singer, and actor who came to fame in a series of movies in which he co-starred alternately with Gloria Jean, Peggy Ryan, and Francis the Talking Mule. He is best remembered today for his role as Gene Kelly’s friend and colleague in “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952).

 

Donald O'Connor  (August 28, 1925 – September 27, 2003)

Donald O’Connor
(August 28, 1925 – September 27, 2003)

Donald O’Connor was born August 28, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois. His parents were Irish-American vaudeville entertainers. When O’Connor was only a few years old, he and his sister Arlene were in a car crash outside a theater in Hartford, Connecticut. O’Connor survived, but his sister was killed. Several weeks later, his father died of a heart attack while dancing on stage in Brockton, Massachusetts. O’Connor began performing in movies in 1937. He appeared opposite Bing Crosby in “Sing, You Sinners” (1938) at age 12. Paramount Pictures used him in both A and B films, including “Tom Sawyer, Detective” (1938) and “Beau Geste” (1939). In 1940, when he had outgrown child roles, he returned to vaudeville. In 1942 O’Connor joined Universal Pictures where he played roles in four of the Gloria Jean musicals, and achieved stardom with “Mister Big” (1943). In 1944 O’connor was drafted into the Army. Before he reported for induction, Universal Pictures rushed him through three feature films, done simultaneously and released when he was overseas. After his discharge, Universal cast him in lightweight musicals and comedies. In 1949, O’Connor played the lead role in “Francis”, the story of a soldier befriended by a talking mule. The film was such a huge success that he made one Francis movie a year until 1955. In what is his most famous role, O’Connor starred opposite Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds in “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952) . His role as Cosmo the piano player in “Singin’ In The Rain” earned him a Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Comedy or Musical. He also starred opposite Marilyn Monroe and Ethel Meriman in “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954).

 

Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Kelly in "Singin' In The Rain" (1952)

Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Kelly in “Singin’ In The Rain” (1952)

 

Donald O’Connor was a regular host of NBC’s “Colgate Comedy Hour”. He hosted a color television special on NBC in 1957 and he had his own television series in the late 1960s.  After overcoming alcoholism in the 1970s, he got a career boost when he hosted the Academy Awards, which earned him two Primetime Emmy nominations. He appeared as a gaslight-era entertainer in the 1981 film “Ragtime”, notable for similar encore performances by James Cagney and Pat O’Brien. O’Connor appeared in the short-lived “Bring Back Birdie” on Broadway in 1981, and continued to make film and television appearances into the 1990s. Donald O’Connor’s last feature film was the Jack Lemmon-Walter Matthau comedy “Out to Sea” (1997). O’Connor was still making public appearances well into 2003.

 

Donald O'Connor and Marilyn Monroe in "There's No Business Like Show Business" (1954)

Donald O’Connor and Marilyn Monroe in “There’s No Business Like Show Business” (1954)

 

O’Connor was married twice. In 1944 he married Gwen Carter. They had one child and were divorced in 1954. He married Gloria Noble in 1956 and they remained married until his death in 2003. Donald and Gloria had three children.

 

Donald O'Connor in "Francis" (1950)

Donald O’Connor in “Francis” (1950)

 

Donald O’Connor died from congestive heart failure on September 27, 2003 in Calabasas, California. He was 78 years old. As some of his last words O’Connor is reported to have expressed tongue-in-cheek thanks to the Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement that he expected to receive at a “future date”. His remains were cremated and buried at the Forest Lawn–Hollywood Hills Cemetery in Los Angeles. He is survived by his wife, Gloria, and four children.

.

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Gloria Jean – singer and actress of film from 1940s and 50s

 

Gloria Jean

Gloria Jean

Gloria Jean is an American singer and actress who starred or co-starred in 26 feature films between 1939 and 1959. She also made radio, television, stage, and nightclub appearances. Gloria Jean was born Gloria Jean Schoonover on April 14, 1926, in Buffalo, New York. Her family moved to Scranton, Pennsylvania, where she sang on radio with Paul Whiteman’s band. In 1938 she won an audition from Universal Pictures movie producer Joe Pasternak. Jean signed a contract with Universal and was given the leading role in the 1939 feature “The Under-Pup”, and became instantly popular with moviegoers. She then co-starred with Bing Crosby in “If I Had My Way” (1940) and starred in the well-received “A Little Bit of Heaven”(1940). Probably her best known picture is her fourth, “Never Give a Sucker an Even Break” (1941) in which she co-starred with W. C. Fields. Gloria Jean then starred in a series of musicals in which she became one of Universal’s most prolific performers. Most were “hepcat” musicals, which were geared to the teenage crowd of that day, and Universal often used them to introduce new talent like Donald O’Connor, Peggy Ryan, Mel Tormé, and Marshall Thompson.

 

Gloria Jean and Donald O'Connor - Gloria and Donald starred together in several "teen" movies as each other's love interests in the early 40's.

Gloria Jean and Donald O’Connor – Gloria and Donald starred together in several “teen” movies as each other’s love interests in the early 40’s.

When Gloria’s Universal contract lapsed, she wanted to renew it but acting on what turned out to be bad advice from her agent, she  opted to go on a tour of busy personal appearances across America and England. In 1946, she returned to Hollywood, but she found that she was no longer in high demand. She resumed her movie career in United Artists, Columbia Pictures, and Allied Artists productions, the most famous being a minor role “Copacabana” (1947) with Groucho Marx. The “Copacabana” role was supposed to reignite her career and did lead to a few more roles, but her career never reached the level of popularity it was at before she went on tour. Her final movie was with Jerry Lewis in “The Ladies Man” (1961), but most of her footage was cut from the final print, and she is barely noticeable among the extras. She retired from show business in 1963.

 

Gloria Jean 1945

Gloria Jean 1945

Gloria Jean was married in 1962 to Franco Cellini. It was a short lived marriage, but which happily produced a son. Gloria lived in California for some time with her sister, Bonnie, until Bonnie’s death in 2007. She now resides in Hawaii with her son and his family.

.

Be sociable...Share!!Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr