Posts Tagged ‘film actress’

Rochelle Hudson acting career spanned four decades

 

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson, born March 6, 1916 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma was a film and television actress whose career spanned four decades from the 1930s through the 1960s. She was named a WAMPAS Baby Star in 1931 along with future Hollywood stars Joan Blondell, Constance Cummings, Frances Dee, and Anita Louise. Hudson may be best remembered today for costarring in “Wild Boys of the Road” (1933), playing Cosette in “Les Miserables” (1935), as the older sister of Shirley Temple’s character in “Curly Top” (1935), and for playing Natalie Wood’s mother in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955). Other notable roles for Hudson include; Sally Glynn the fallen ingenue in “She Done Him Wrong” (1933) starring Cary Grant and Mae West; Richard Cromwell’s love interest in the Will Rogers showcase “Life Begins at Forty” (1935); “Way Down East” (1935) with Henry Fonda; the daughter of carnival barker W.C. Fields in “Poppy” (1936); and Claudette Colbert’s adult daughter in “Imitation of Life” (1934).

 

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson


 

In the 1954–1955 television season, Hudson co-starred with Gil Stratton and Eddie Mayehoff in the CBS situation comedy “That’s My Boy”, based on the 1951 Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin film of the same name. Other television credits include appearing on Racket Squad in 1951, Schlitz Playhouse in 1952, Shower of Stars in 1954, Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre in 1955, and Branded in 1965.

 

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in "Way Down East" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in
“Way Down East” (1935)


 

Hudson was married four times. Her first husband was Charles Brust. Little is known of the marriage other than it ended in divorce. She remarried in 1939 to Harold Thompson, who was the head of the Storyline Department at Disney Studios. She assisted Thompson, who was doing espionage work in Mexico as a civilian during World War II. They posed as a vacationing couple to various parts of Mexico, to detect if there was any German activity in these areas. One of their more successful vacations uncovered a supply of high test aviation gas hidden by German agents in Baja California. After their divorce in 1947, Hudson married a third time the following year to Los Angeles Times sportswriter, Dick Irving Hyland. The marriage lasted two years before the couple divorced. Her final marriage was to Robert Mindell, a hotel executive. The couple remained together for eight years before they divorced in 1971.

 

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in "Imitation of Life" (1934)

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in
“Imitation of Life” (1934)


 

On January 17, 1972, Hudson was found dead in her home at the Palm Desert Country Club. A business associate with whom she had been working in real estate discovered her body on her bathroom floor. Hudson had died of a heart attack brought on by a liver ailment. Her only close survivor was her mother.

 

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in "Poppy" (1936)

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in
“Poppy” (1936)

 

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in "Curly Top" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in
“Curly Top” (1935)

 

Rochelle Hudson - Bathing Beauty -  ca.1940s

Rochelle Hudson

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Marla English a 1950s Hollywood Motion Picture Actress

 

Marla English was a motion picture actress from San Diego, California who appeared in several movies during the 1950s.

 

Marla English (January 4, 1935 – December 10, 2012)

Marla English (January 4, 1935 – December 10, 2012)

Marla English was born Marleine Gaile English on January 4, 1935 in San Diego, California to Bertha Lenore and Arthur H. English. Marla was a nickname given to her by friends of the family who took care of her when her mother fell ill in 1939. English started modeling bathing attire for leading advertising agencies at the age of twelve. During her teen years English enters several bathing beauty contests and each time emerges a winner. During her sophmore year in high school she became a member of San Diego’s Globe Theatre and played roles in their productions of “Mad Woman of Chaillot” and “Cricket on the Hearth” while continuing her modeling career. Upon graduating high school in 1952 English was signed to a contract by Paramount Pictures after winning a San Diego beauty pageant. Paramount brought English along slowly, putting her in bit parts in such films as “Red Garters” (1954) with Rosemary Clooney, Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” (1954) with James Stewart and Grace Kelly, and “Yankee Pasha” (1954) with Jeff Chandler and Rhonda Fleming. In 1955 English starred opposite John Ireland in “Hell’s Horizon” and with Ralph Meeker in “Desert Sands”.

 

Marla English entered several bathing beauty contests during her teen years and each time emerged a winner.

Marla English entered several bathing beauty contests during her teen years and each time emerged a winner.


 

English received a major break in 1955 when she was cast opposite Spencer Tracy in “The Mountain” (1956), a film which was to be made in France. English was given a smallpox vaccine before leaving to go on location and quickly developed a raging fever and decided to pull out of the movie. As a result Paramount suspends English and replaces her with Barbara Darrow. Parade Magazine was purportedly told that English had fallen in love with Paramount actor Larry Pennell and had became enraged when the studio would not give Pennell a role in the film so they could travel to France together and that was why she had pulled out of the movie. In a September 1955 interview with Parade, English admits pulling out of the film was a very dumb move and she was unsure why she decided against making “The Mountain”.

 

Marla English with John Ireland in the Columbia war drama "Hell's Horizon" (1955)

Marla English with John Ireland in the Columbia war drama
“Hell’s Horizon” (1955)


 

After Paramount dropped her contact English starred in mostly B-movie films throughout the rest of her Hollywood movie career. Some of these include “Three Bad Sisters” (1956), “Runaway Daughters” (1956), “The She Creature” (1956), and “Flesh and the Spur” (1956). English gave up her acting career in 1956 when she became engaged to San Diego businessman A. Paul Sutherland. English was just twenty-one at the time. Her final film role came in American International’s horror flick “Voodoo Woman” which was released in 1957. The couple married in 1956 and remained together until her death in 2012. English and Sutherland had four sons together and a daughter, Ann, from his previous marriage.

 

Marla English with Ralph Meeker in "Desert Sands" (1955)

Marla English with Ralph Meeker in “Desert Sands” (1955)


 

Marla English died December 10, 2012 in Tucson, Arizona after a four-year battle with cancer. English is survived by her husband of fifty-six years, her five children, eight grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Marla English and John Agar in "Flesh and the Spur" (1956)

Marla English and John Agar in “Flesh and the Spur” (1956)


 
Marla English with Mike Connors in "Voodoo Woman" (1957).

Marla English with Mike Connors in
“Voodoo Woman” (1957).

 

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Dennie Moore was an American film and stage actress

 

Dennie Moore (December 31, 1902 – February 22, 1978) was an American film and stage actress who made a career playing secretaries, maids, department store clerks, busybodies, roommates, and wives. Moore will always be remembered as the chatty manicurist who spills the beans to Norma Shearer about her husband’s illicit affair with Joan Crawford in the classic “The Women” (1939).

 

Dennie Moore  (December 31, 1902 – February 22, 1978) was an American film and stage actress.

Dennie Moore
(December 31, 1902 – February 22, 1978)

Dennie Moore was born Deena Rivka Moore on New Year’s Eve 1902 in New York City to Jewish parents Oren Moore, a cantor at one of the local synagogues, and Gabriella Gefen. In the late 1920s, Moore decided to pursue an acting career on the Broadway stage. Using the name Dennie because her family did not approve of her career move based on their religious views, Moore began her career on Broadway in 1927, appearing in such plays as “A Lady in Love”, “The Trial of Mary Dugan”, “Cross Roads”, “Torch Song”, “Twentieth Century”, “Phantoms”, “Conflict”, “Anatol”, and “Jarnegan”. By the time she made her screen debut in 1935, Moore had over twenty stage roles to her credit. Her first screen appearance was in an uncredited role opposite Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn in “Sylvia Scarlett” (1935) for RKO Radio Pictures. In the course of her film career, Moore would star in twenty-two films between 1935 and 1951, mostly as a “free-lance actress” floating primarily between Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Warner Brothers Studios. Some of her film credits include parts in “The Perfect Speciman” (1937), “Boy Meets Girl” (1938), “The Women” (1939), “Bachelor Mother” (1939), “Saturday’s Children” (1940), “Dive Bomber” (1941), and “Anna Lucasta” (1949) appearing alongside such actors as Edward Arnold, Victor Jory, Marlene Dietrich, Melvyn Douglas, Edward Everett Horton, Norma Shearer, Errol Flynn, Joan Blondell, Pat O’Brien, Ann Sheridan, George Brent, David Niven, John Garfield, Rosalind Russell, Fred MacMurray and Ginger Rogers. In 1951, Moore made her last screen appearance as Mrs. Bea Gingras in “The Model and the Marriage Broker”.

 

Errol Flynn, Joan Blondell, Dennie Moore, and Allen Jenkins in "The Perfect Speciman" (1937)

Errol Flynn, Joan Blondell, Dennie Moore, and Allen Jenkins in
“The Perfect Speciman” (1937)

Following her last screen role Moore sold her house in Hollywood and permanently moved backed to her birthplace of New York City where she made one final performance on stage in “The Diary of Anne Frank” in the role of Mrs. Van Daan. In 1957 at the age of fifty-four she retired from acting altogether. Moore spent her retirement speaking on behalf of women’s rights and civil liberties in Jewish communities.

 

Dennie Moore (left) and Rosalind Russell in "The Women" (1939)

Dennie Moore (left) and Rosalind Russell in “The Women” (1939)

 

Dennie Moore died of natural causes in her New York apartment on February 22, 1978. She had no survivors or immediate family when she died and upon her death was promptly cremated and her ashes scattered over the balcony of her New York City apartment. Moore was seventy-five years old at the time of her death.

 

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Patricia Morison – Popular Broadway and Motion Picture Actress

 

Patricia Morison is an American stage and motion picture actress and mezzo-soprano singer. During her time as a screen actress she was lauded for her patrician beauty, with her large eyes and extremely long, dark hair among her most notable physical attributes. As a film actress, Morison was often cast as the femme fatale or ‘other woman’ and was never truly given a chance at screen stardom. It was when she returned to the Broadway stage that she achieved her greatest success as the lead in the original production of Cole Porter’s “Kiss Me, Kate”.

 

Patricia Morison -- 1939 publicity photo

Patricia Morison — 1939 publicity photo

Patricia Morison was born Eileen Patricia Augusta Fraser Morison on March 19, 1914 in New York City, New York. Her father, William Morison, was a playwright and occasional actor who billed himself under the name Norman Rainey. Her mother, Selena Morison worked for British Intelligence during World War I. After graduating from Washington Irving High School in New York, Morison studied at the Arts Students League while taking acting classes at the Neighborhood Playhouse. She also studied dance under Martha Graham. During this time she was employed as a dress shop designer at Russeks Department Store. In November 1933, at the age of nineteen, Morison made her Broadway debut in the short-lived play “Growing Pains” and proceeded to understudy the legendary Helen Hayes in her classic role of “Victoria Regina”. Hayes never missed a performance and alas, Morison never had the opportunity to play her role. In 1935, four years before her official film debut, Morison made her first appearance on film in an automobile propaganda short called Wreckless. In 1938, Morison appeared in the musical “The Two Bouquets”, which ran for only fifty-five performances. Among the other cast members was Alfred Drake, who, years later, would co-star with Morison in “Kiss Me, Kate”. While appearing in “The Two Bouquets”, Morison was noticed by talent scouts from Paramount Pictures, who at the time were looking for exotic, dark-haired glamorous types similar to Dorothy Lamour. The blue-eyed beauty, who did resemble Lamour, was signed and made her film debut the following year showing bright promise in the “B” film Persons in “Hiding” (1939). The following year Morison appeared opposite Ray Milland in the Technicolor romance “Untamed”, a re-make of the Clara Bow vehicle, “Man Trap” (1926).

 

Patricia Morison 1939 Portrait

Patricia Morison 1939 Portrait


 

Despite garnering good reviews and the promising beginnings, Morison was assigned to several second-tier pictures such as “Rangers of Fortune” (1940) and “One Night in Lisbon” (1941), both with Fred MacMurray, and “The Roundup” (1941) with Richard Dix and Preston Foster. On a loan-out to 20th Century-Fox Morison played one of her first villainess roles in “Romance of the Rio Grande” (1941), which starred Cesar Romero as the Cisco Kid. In 1942 came more unrewarding roles with Paramount in the films “Night in New Orleans” (1942) with Preston Foster, the Technicolor “Beyond the Blue Horizon” (1942) with the sarong-clad Dorothy Lamour, and “Are Husbands Necessary?” (1942), which re-teamed her with Ray Milland. After being considered for, but not given, the lead role opposite Alan Ladd in “The Glass Key” (1942) Morison left Paramount. Said Morison of the experience, “I was fitted for costumes in ‘The Glass Key’ with Alan Ladd when I was told by the studio boss, Buddy De Sylva, that Veronica Lake would do the part. He said I could stick around and play heavies. I said no! I over-ate my way out of the Paramount contract.”

 

Patricia Morison 1939

Patricia Morison 1939


 

After leaving Paramount, Morison became one of many celebrities who entertained American troops and their allies during WWII. In November of 1942 she joined Al Jolson, Merle Oberon, Allen Jenkins, and Frank McHugh on a USO Tour in Great Britain. After several months of touring with the USO, Morison returned to the states to continue her film career as a freelance performer. One of her better roles, albeit a small supporting one, was that of Empress Eugénie in “The Song of Bernadette” (1943) starring Jennifer Jones. Morison also appeared in “The Fallen Sparrow” (1943) with John Garfield and Maureen O’Hara, and “Calling Dr. Death” (1945), one of the “Inner Sanctum” films starring Lon Chaney, Jr. In 1944, Morison briefly abandoned her film work and returned to the Broadway stage. In April of that year, she opened at the Adelphi Theatre in a musical comedy, “Allah Be Praised!”. The play, however, was unsuccessful and closed after a very brief run of only 20 performances.

 

Patricia Morison

Patricia Morison


 

Returning to films once again, Morison continued to be cast in supporting roles, all too often as a femme fatale or an unsympathetic ‘other woman’. These included the Spencer Tracy-Katharine Hepburn vehicle “Without Love” (1945) and the Deanna Durbin comedy-mystery “Lady on a Train” (1945). She also played the villainess in the final installments of Universal’s Sherlock Holmes series “Dressed to Kill” (1946), starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, and MGM’s Thin Man series “Song of the Thin Man” (1947), starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. Morison also appeared as a villainess in “Tarzan and the Huntress” (1947) with Johnny Weissmuller. Her few leading roles during this time were in “B” pictures, most notably as Maid Marian to Jon Hall’s Robin Hood in “The Prince of Thieves” (1947), in the action film “Queen of the Amazons” (1947) and with Richard Arlen in the western “The Return of Wildfire” (1948). In one of her choice roles, Morison played Victor Mature’s despairing, suicide-driven wife in “Kiss of Death” (1947), but her role was cut from the final print, as the producers supposedly felt audiences of the time were not ready for a scene that depicted suicide.

 

Patricia Morison with Nigel Bruce and Basil Rathbone between scenes of "Dressed to Kill" (1946)

Patricia Morison with Nigel Bruce and Basil Rathbone between scenes of “Dressed to Kill” (1946)


 

In 1948, Morison once more returned to the stage and achieved her greatest success as an actress. Cole Porter had heard her sing while in Hollywood and decided that she had the vocal expertise and feistiness to play the female lead in his new show, “Kiss Me, Kate”. Morison went on to major Broadway stardom when she created the role of Lilli Vanessi, the imperious stage diva whose own volatile personality coincided with that of her onstage role (Kate from The Taming of the Shrew). “Kiss Me, Kate” featured the songs “I Hate Men,” “Wunderbar” and “So in Love”, and also reunited Morison with her former Broadway co-star Alfred Drake. The play ran on Broadway from December 30, 1948 until July 28, 1951, for a total of 1,077 performances. Morison also played in the London production of “Kiss Me, Kate”, which ran for 400 performances.

 

Patricia Morison relaxes with  her dachshund Judy in 1940.

Patricia Morison relaxes with her dachshund Judy in 1940.


 

During the 1950s and 1960s, Morison made several appearances on television, including several variety shows. Among these were a production of “Rio Rita” on “Robert Montgomery Presents” (1950) and a segment from “The King and I” on a 1955 broadcast of “The Toast of the Town” starring Ed Sullivan. Morison and Alfred Drake recreated their “Kiss Me, Kate” roles in a Hallmark Hall of Fame production of the play broadcast in color on November 20, 1958. She also appeared with Howard Keel in a production of Kate on British television in 1964. In 1971 Morison and Yul Brynner performed “Shall We Dance” from The King and I on a broadcast of the Tony Awards. Among her non-musical television performances were a recurring role on the detective series “The Cases of Eddie Drake” (1952) co-starring Don Haggerty, and a guest appearance with Vincent Price on “Have Gun — Will Travel” (1958) starring Richard Boone. Years later Morison appeared in the made-for-TV movie “Mirrors” (1985) and a guest role in 1989 on the popular sitcom “Cheers”.

 

Patricia Morison

Patricia Morison


 

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Morison performed on stage numerous times, largely in stock and touring productions. These included both musical and dramatic plays, among them “Kismet”, “The Merry Widow”, “Song of Norway”, “Do I Hear a Waltz?”, “Bell, Book and Candle”, “The Fourposter”, “Separate Tables”, and “Private Lives”. Morison also performed in still more productions of “Kiss, Me Kate” at the Seattle Opera House (opening in April 1965) and the New York City Center (opening May 12, 1965). In August 1972, she appeared in a production of “The Sound of Music” at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. In November 1978 she again played the leading role in “Kiss Me, Kate” at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in England.

 

Patricia Morison -- 1939 photo

Patricia Morison — 1939 photo


 

In recent years Patricia Morison has devoted herself to painting, one of her early passions, and has had several showings in and around Los Angeles.
Patricia Morison has never married and has lived in the Park La Brea apartment complex in Los Angeles since 1961.

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Marjorie Weaver: Film actress from the 1930’s to the 1950s

 

Marjorie Weaver  (March 2, 1913 - October 1, 1994)

Marjorie Weaver
(March 2, 1913 – October 1, 1994)

Marjorie Weaver was an American film actress of the 1930s through the early 1950s. Weaver was born on March 2, 1913 in Crossville, Tennessee. She attended the University of Kentucky, and later the University of Indiana, with interests in music. Showing early signs of a musical talent, Weaver began to make use of her beauty and singing capabilities as she tried to find a place for herself in the entertainment business. Weaver found work as a model, band singer, and stage actress in the early 1930s, before appearring in her first film “Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round” (1934) in an uncredited role. Over the next couple years she would receive steady acting roles and began receiving credited roles in larger productions. She starred opposite Ricardo Cortez in the 1937 film “The Californian” and that same year she would appear opposite Tyrone Power in “Second Honeymoon”.

 

Marjorie Weaver and Richard Derr in "Man at Large" (1941)

Marjorie Weaver and Richard Derr in “Man at Large” (1941)

Weaver would go on to star in over twenty five films the next few years with her most notable role in “Young Mr. Lincoln” (1939), which also starred Henry Fonda and Alice Brady. Other films of note during that time include; “I’ll Give a Million” (1938) with Warner Baxter, “Hold That Co-ed” (1938) opposite John Barrymore, “The Cisco Kid and the Lady” (1939) opposite Cesar Romero, the comedy “Sally, Irene and Mary” (1938) with Alice Faye and Joan Davis in which they played a trio of starry-eyed hopefuls, in a couple of The Ritz Brothers vehicles “Life Begins in College” (1937) and “Kentucky Moonshine” (1938), “Murder Among Friends” (1941) and “Man at Large” (1941).

 

Marjorie Weaver (top) with Joan Davis (center) and Alice Faye (bottom) in "Sally, Irene, and Mary" (1938)

Marjorie Weaver (top) with Joan Davis (center) and Alice Faye (bottom) in “Sally, Irene, and Mary” (1938)

In the early 1940s Weaver’s roles began to be less consequential with many of them in “B’ movies. She would co-star in two “Charlie Chan” and three “Michael Shayne” mysteries and in 1944 had a favorable role the serial “The Great Alaskan Mystery”. In 1945, she starred opposite Robert Lowery in “Fashion Model”, which would be her last role of any consequence. After a few minor roles in 1952, Weaver retired from acting.

 

Marjorie Weaver in "Sally, Mary and Irene" (1938)

Marjorie Weaver in “Sally, Mary and Irene” (1938)

Marjorie Weaver married businessman Don Briggs in 1943, with whom she would have a son and a daughter, Joel and Leigh. Weaver and her husband opened a business in Los Angeles, which they operated until retirement, at which time they moved to Austin, Texas. The couple remained married until her death in 1994.

 

Marjorie Weaver was an American film actress of the 1930s through the early 1950s.

Marjorie Weaver was an American film actress of the 1930s through the early 1950s.

Marjorie Weaver died of a heart attack on October 1, 1994, in Austin, Texas.

 

Marjorie Weaver had 42 film credits during her career.

Marjorie Weaver had 42 film credits during her career.

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