Posts Tagged ‘Gary Cooper’

Tallulah Bankhead – A Pictorial

 
When asked by gossip columnist Earl Wilson if she had ever been mistaken for a man on the phone (due to her deep husky voice), Tallulah Bankhead replied, “No, have you?”
 

Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“I read Shakespeare and the Bible, and I can shoot dice. That’s what I call a liberal education.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“The only thing I regret about my past is the length of it. If I had to live my life again, I’d make the same mistakes, only sooner.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“It’s the good girls who keep diaries, the bad girls never have the time.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“My father warned me about men and booze, but he never mentioned a word about women and cocaine.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead


 
“I’m the foe of moderation, the champion of excess. If I may lift a line from a die-hard whose identity is lost in the shuffle, I’d rather be strongly wrong than weakly right.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead with Gary Cooper in "Devil and the Deep" (1932)

Tallulah Bankhead with Gary Cooper in
“Devil and the Deep” (1932)


 
“Say anything about me, dahling, as long as it isn’t boring.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 
Tallulah Bankhead with Robert Montgomery in "Faithless" (1932)

Tallulah Bankhead with Robert Montgomery in “Faithless” (1932)


 
“Nobody can be exactly like me. Even I have trouble doing it.” ~ Tallulah Bankhead
 

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Silver Screen Sirens: Katy Jurado

 

Katy Jurado 1950

Katy Jurado 1950

Katy Jurado, born María Cristina Estela Marcela Jurado García on January 16, 1924 in Mexico City, was a Mexican actress who had a successful film career both in Mexico and in Hollywood. Jurado had already established herself as an actress in Mexico in the 1940s when she came to Hollywood, becoming a regular in Western films of the 1950s and 1960s. She worked with many Hollywood legends, including Gary Cooper in “High Noon” (1952), Spencer Tracy in “Broken Lance” (1954), and Marlon Brando in “One-Eyed Jacks” (1961), and such respected directors as Fred Zinnemann (High Noon), Sam Peckinpah (The Wild Bunch and Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid) and John Huston (Under the Volcano). Jurado made seventy-one films during her career. She became the first Latin American actress nominated for an Academy Award, as Best Supporting Actress for her work in 1954’s Broken Lance, and was the first to win a Golden Globe Award. Like many Latin actors, she was typecast to play ethnic roles in American films. By contrast, she had a greater variety of roles in Mexican films. Jurado was one of very few Mexican actresses to succeed in Hollywood. Others are Dolores del Río, Lupe Vélez, and Salma Hayek. Jurado died of kidney failure and pulmonary disease on July 5, 2002, at the age of 78, at her home in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. She was buried in Cuernavaca, Mexico, at the Panteón de la Páz cemetery.

 

Katy Jurado

Katy Jurado

 

Katy Jurado and Marlon Brando at an Awards ceremony. ca.1955

Katy Jurado and Marlon Brando at an Awards ceremony. ca.1955

 

Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado, Gary Cooper, and Grace Kelly from "High Noon" (1952)

Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado, Gary Cooper, and Grace Kelly from “High Noon” (1952)

 

Alan Ladd, Katy Jurado, and Ernest Borgnine on the set of "The Badlanders" (1958)

Alan Ladd, Katy Jurado, and Ernest Borgnine on the set of “The Badlanders” (1958)

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Laraine Day

 

Laraine Day
(October 13, 1920 – November 10, 2007)

 

Laraine Day 1949

Laraine Day was born La Raine Johnson on October 13, 1920 in Roosevelt, Utah, to an affluent Mormon family. She later moved to California where she was a 1938 graduate of Polytechnic High School in Long Beach, California and began her acting career with the Long Beach Players. In 1937, Day debuted onscreen in a bit part in Stella Dallas. Shortly afterwards, she won lead roles in several George O’Brien westerns at RKO, in which she was billed as “Laraine Hays” and then “Laraine Johnson”, such as “Border G-Man” (1938), “Painted Desert” (1938), and “Arizona Legion” (1939). In 1939 she signed with MGM and changed her stage name to Laraine Day. At MGM she became popular and well-known as “Nurse Mary Lamont”, the title character’s fiancee in a string of seven “Dr. Kildare” movies beginning with Calling Dr. Kildare (1939), with Lew Ayres in the title role. Other movies of note for MGM were “The Trial of Mary Dugan” (1941) opposite Robert Young, “Fingers at the Window” (1942) with Lew Ayers and Basil Rathbone, and “Keep Your Powder Dry” (1945) with Lana Turner and Susan Peters. Most of these roles were in medium budget films and did not do much to advance the career of such an attractive and talented performer such as Laraine Day.

 

Laraine Day

At MGM, Day was often loaned out to other studios for roles that were for the most part far more stimulating than those MGM gave her, including a prominent supporting part in the Irish melodrama “My Son, My Son!” (1940). Some of the other roles Day had with other studios during this time were in the Alfred Hitchcock thriller “Foreign Correspondent” (1940) with Joel McCrea, “Mr. Lucky” (1943) with Cary Grant, “The Story of Dr. Wassell” (1944) with Gary Cooper, and the psychological mystery “The Locket” (1946) with Robert Mitchum, Brian Aherne, and Gene Raymond.

 

Laraine Day and Gary Cooper in “The Story of Dr. Wassell” (1944)

In 1945 MGM told Day that if she did “Keep Your Powder Dry” (1945) that she would be rewarded with the female lead in “Undercurrent” (1946) with Robert Taylor. When the role was given to Katharine Hepburn Day left MGM and never returned. Day would later be quoted as saying, “MGM never really gave me a break. They loaned me out for leading roles, but cast me in programme pictures.” After Leaving MGM Day went on to star in movies such as “Tycoon” (1947) with John Wayne, “My Dear Secretary” (1948) with Kirk Douglas, “The Woman on Pier 13” (1949), and “Without Honor” (1949). As her movie career started to decline, Day turned to television and in 1951 hosted her own show called “Daydreaming With Laraine”. Day went on to appear on many television shows and movies over the next thirty seven years. Among the many other shows Day appeared in were: “All Star Revue”, “Screen Directors Playhouse”, “Celebrity Playhouse”, “The Loretta Young Show”, “The Alfred Hitchcock Hour”, “Wagon Train”, “The Love Boat”, and “Fantasy Island”. Her last role was in 1987 in a two part series for “Murder, She Wrote”.

 

Laraine Day with Cary Grant in “Mr. Lucky” (1943)

 

In her personal life, Laraine Day was described by many as being very kind, intellectual, ladylike, and influential. She had long friendships with many of her co-stars, some of which included Cary Grant, Shirley Temple, Herbert Marshall, Joel McCrea, John Wayne, Lew Ayres, Robert Young, Robert Mitchum, Marsha Hunt, and Angela Lansbury. Day recalls one of her fonder memories, “I recall playing practical jokes with John Wayne. I once got a whole bunch of keys and had little tags made that said, “If lost, please return to John Wayne, RKO Studios. Reward.” And I just dropped them all over town. He got a lot of phone calls, people showing up at the studio. He never learned who did it.”

 

Laraine Day, John Wayne, and Anthony Quinn in “Tycoon” (1947)

 

A very patriotic American, she displayed the American flag outside her home everyday of the year. On days when the weather was unfit for the flag to be displayed outdoors Day hung it within her home. During her time in Hollywood, she hosted a big BBQ at her home every July 4 and invited not just her family but many of her friends from the acting world. She was the photo girl of the World War II plane “Lucky Lady”, PC-3 headed by Max Pyles. In 1944 Pyles wrote Day, who was at the time a favorite with lonesome G.I.’s, asking her for a photograph to put on the plane. Day immediately wrote back with an attached photo of her in a negligee and the “Lucky Lady” soon became and held the honor of having the highest record flights in the autumn of 1944. Her photo remained pasted on the L/gun door and the crew and Day frequently sent letters back and forth. Day was very proud and interested to get updates about “her airplane”.

 

Laraine Day and Shirley Temple in “Kathleen” (1941)

 

Day was a devout Morman and was very active in her church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Day’s fame mostly coincided with her dedication to Mormonism. Throughout her life she never swore, smoked, or drank any kind of alcohol, coffee or tea. In 1961 she appeared with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir in their production of “Let Freedom Ring” which was an inspirational one hour program dedicated to the spirit of American Freedom. Day was very honored to have had the opportunity. Other members of this special included Howard Keel, Richard Boone, and Dan O’Herlihy. Her then husband Michael Grilikhes produced and wrote the special. Until her death in 2007 she retained her Mormon faith stating that, “It brings me comfort in a confusing world”.

 

Laraine Day

 

Laraine Day was married three times. Her first marriage was to Ray Hendricks in 1942. The couple divorced in 1947.
Day then married baseball manager Leo Durocher in 1947. She took such an active interest in his career and the sport of baseball in general that she became known as “The First Lady of Baseball”. While Durocher was managing the New York Giants, she wrote, “Day With the Giants” in 1952. That same year she wrote and published another book entitled “The America We Love”. She was also the host of “Day With the Giants,” a 15-minute television interview program broadcast before New York Giants home games. Day and Durocher were married for thirteen years before divorcing in 1960.
Shortly after her divorce from Durocher, Day married television producer Michael Grilikhes in 1960. She and Grilikhes had two daughters, Dana in 1962 and Gigi in 1964. They remained married until his death in 2007.

 

Laraine Day with third husband Michael Grilikhes

 

Laraine Day moved back to her native Utah in March 2007 following the death of her third husband Michael Grilikhes. She had been a resident of California for over seventy years. She died in Ivins, Utah on Saturday, November 10, 2007 at age 87 from natural causes. Following her death her body was taken back to California and on Thursday, November 15, 2007 a memorial service was held at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in the Hollywood Hills. She is buried there next to her husband Michael.
For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Laraine Day has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6676 Hollywood Blvd.

 

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Esther Ralston

 

Esther Ralston (September 17, 1902 – January 14, 1994) was an American movie actress whose greatest popularity came during the silent era.

 

Esther Ralston

 

Ralston was born September 17, 1902 in Bar Harbor, Maine. She started as a child actress in a family vaudeville act which was billed as “The Ralston Family with Baby Esther, America’s Youngest Juliet.” In 1920, Ralston appeared in her first movie in “Huckleberry Finn”. She appeared in a few more small silent film roles before gaining attention as Mrs. Darling in the 1924 version of “Peter Pan”. During the mid to late 1920s she appeared in many films for Paramount such as; “A Kiss for Cinderella” (1926), “Old Ironsides” (1926) with Wallace Beery and Charles Farrell, “The American Venus” (1926), “Children of Divorce” (1927) with Clara Bow and Gary Cooper, “The Case of Lena Smith” (1929), and “Betrayal” (1929) with Gary Cooper. At one point Ralston was one of the highest paid stars of her time earning as much as $8000 a week, garnering much popularity, especially in Britain. Despite making a successful transition to sound, she was reduced to appearing in B-movies by the mid-1930s, leading to her retirement. Some of note are; “To the Last Man” (1933) opposite Randolph Scott, “Sadie McKee” (1934) with Joan Crawford, Gene Raymond, Franchot Tone and Edward Arnold, and “Ladies Crave Excitement” (1935). Her last movie role was in “San Francisco Docks” (1940). By the time she retired in 1941 , Ralston had made over 100 movies.

 

Esther Ralston

Ralston made four appearances on television series during the 1950’s and early 60’s; on “Kraft Theatre” in 1952, “Tales of Tomorrow” in 1952, “Broadway Television Theatre” in 1953, and nine years later on “Our Five Daughters” in 1962.

 

Esther Ralston and Clara Bow in “Children of Divorce” (1927)

 

Ralston was married and divorced three times. George Webb from 1925 to 1933, Will Morgan from 1934 to 1938, and Ted Lloyd from 1939 to 1954. She had two daughters and one son from her marriages.

 

Esther Ralston with Gary Cooper in “Betrayal” (1929)

Esther Ralston died in Ventura, California on January 14, 1994 of a heart attack.
She was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (6664 Hollywood Boulevard) for her popular work in motion pictures.

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Shirley Temple – A Pictorial

 

“Acting is the most minor of gifts. After all, Shirley Temple could do it when she was four.” ~ Katharine Hepburn

 

Shirley Temple

 

Gertrude Temple’s advice to her daughter before each scene was “Sparkle, Shirley, sparkle!”

 

Shirley Temple

 

“Any star can be devoured by human adoration, sparkle by sparkle.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple in "Curly Top" (1935)

 

“When I was 14, I was the oldest I ever was. I’ve been getting younger ever since.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Gary Cooper and Shirley Temple in "Now and Forever" (1934)

 

“I stopped believing in Santa Claus when I was six. Mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple

 

“One famous movie executive who shall remain nameless, exposed himself to me in his office. ‘Mr X,’ I said, ‘I thought you were a producer not an exhibitor’.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple in "I'll Be Seeing You" (1944)

 

“Shirley Temple doesn’t hurt Shirley Temple Black. Shirley Temple helps Shirley Temple Black. She is thought of as a friend, which I am!” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple

 

“Good luck needs no explanation.” ~ Shirley Temple

 

Shirley Temple

 

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