Posts Tagged ‘Hollywood film actress’

Gloria Talbott a popular actress during the 1950’s and 60’s.

 

Gloria Talbott was a popular actress during the 1950’s and 60’s with over a hundred film and television credits during her career.

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott was born February 7, 1931 in Glendale in Los Angeles County, California, a city co-founded by one of her grandfathers. Her sister, Lori Talbott, also became an actress. Talbott began her career as a child actress in such films as “Maytime” (1937) , “Sweet and Low-down” (1944) and “A Tree Grows In Brooklyn” (1945). After leaving school, Talbott formed a dramatic group and played “arena”-style shows at various clubs. After a three-year hiatus from acting (1948-50) due to marriage, motherhood and a divorce, she resumed her career, working regularly in both television and films. Talbott appeared films such as “Desert Pursuit” (1952), “Crashout” (1955), the Humphrey Bogart comedy “We’re No Angels” (1955), “Lucy Gallant” (1955), and “All That Heaven Allows” (1955). Some of her other movies include “The Oklahoman” (1957) with Joel McCrae and Barbara Hale, “Cattle Empire” (1958), and “The Oregon Trail” (1959) with Fred MacMurray. Talbott also became known as a ‘scream queen’ in the late 1950’s after appearing in a number of horror films including “The Daughter of Dr. Jekyll” (1957), “The Cyclops” (1957), “I Married a Monster from Outer Space” (1958) and “The Leech Woman” (1960). Her final film role was as Bri Quince in the 1966 Western film “An Eye for an Eye”.

 

Gloria Talbott, Fred MacMurray, and unknown in "The Oregon Trail" (1959)

Gloria Talbott, Fred MacMurray, and unknown in
“The Oregon Trail” (1959)

 

During the 1950’s and 60’s Talbott also worked extensively in television. Some of her many television credits include appearances in shows and television movies such as “Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok” (1951), “Hopalong Cassidy” (1953), “TV Reader’s Digest” episode ‘America’s First Great Lady’ as Pocahontas (1955), “Fireside Theatre” (four episodes in 1953 and 54), “Adventures of Superman” (1956), “Zane Grey Theater” (1956), three episodes in “The Restless Gun” (1958), “Zorro” (four episodes in 1959), “Wanted: Dead or Alive” (three episodes 1958-1960), “Rawhide” (three episodes 1959-1961), “The Untouchables” (1962), “Laramie” (four episodes 1960-1963), “Gunsmoke” (three episodes 1955-1963), “Lassie” (1965), and Perry Mason (four episodes 1961-1966).

 

Gloria Talbott withTom Tryon in "I Married a Monster From Outer Space" (1958)

Gloria Talbott withTom Tryon in
“I Married a Monster From Outer Space” (1958)

 

Gloria Talbott was married four times. Her first marriage was to KUSC broadcaster Gene Stanley Parrish on February 19, 1949. They divorced in 1953. Her second marriage was to Sandy Sanders in June 1956. They divorced nine years later in 1965. Her third marriage was to Dr. Steven J. Capabianco in January 1967. They divorced in 1969 after only two years of marriage. Talbott’s fourth and last marriage was to Patrick Mullally on April 27, 1970. The couple remained married until her death in September of 2000.
Talbott had a son, Mark, by her first husband Gene Parrish and a daughter, Mea, with Dr. Steven J. Capabianco, her third husband. Her daughter Mea won three gold medals in local ice skating competitions while she grew up is now an aspiring actress. Mae would rename herself Mea M. Mullally, taking the last name of man who raised her, Talbott’s fourth husband Patrick Mullally.

 

Gloria Talbott with Robert Stack in a 1962 episode of the television series "The Untouchables" (1962)

Gloria Talbott with Robert Stack in a 1962 episode of
the television series “The Untouchables” (1962)

 

Gloria Talbott died from kidney failure September 19, 2000 (aged 69) in Glendale, California. She is interred in the Mausoleum at San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills, Los Angeles County, California.

 

Gloria Talbott in "The Oklahoman" (1957)

Gloria Talbott in “The Oklahoman” (1957)

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

 

Gloria Talbott

Gloria Talbott

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Virginia Mayo

 

Virginia Mayo

Virginia Mayo was born on November 30, 1920 in in St. Louis, Missouri to Luke and Martha Henrietta Jones. The family had a rich heritage in the St. Louis area. Her great-great-great-grandfather served in the American Revolution and later founded the city of East Saint Louis, Illinois, located right across the Mississippi River from its namesake. From an early age Mayo was interested in show business and at the age of six she began taking lessons at her aunt’s dance studio. She appeared in the St. Louis Municipal Opera chorus and then appeared with six other girls at an act at the Jefferson Hotel, where she was recruited by vaudeville performer Andy Mayo to appear in his act (as ringmaster for two men in a horse suit), taking his surname as her stage name. She appeared in vaudeville for three years in the act, appearing with Eddie Cantor on Broadway in 1941’s Banjo Eyes. After graduating from high school in 1937, she became a member of the St. Louis Municipal Opera before she was signed to a contract by Samuel Goldwyn after being spotted by an MGM talent scout during a Broadway revue. David O. Selznick gave her a screen test, but decided against using her in films.

 

Virginia Mayo

Goldwyn though believed that Mayo had talent as an actress and cast her in a small role in “Jack London” (1943). She later had a walk-on part in “Follies Girl” (1943) that same year. Believing there was more to her than her obvious ravishing beauty, producers began to give her bigger and better roles. In 1944 she was cast as Princess Margaret in “The Princess and the Pirate” (1944), with Bob Hope and a year later appeared as Ellen Shavley in “Wonder Man” (1945).

 

Virginia Mayo and James Cagney in “White Heat” (1949)

With her popularity increasing with every appearance, Virginia was cast in two more films in 1946, “The Kid from Brooklyn” (1946), with Danny Kaye, and “The Best Years of Our Lives” (1946), with Dana Andrews receiving good reviews in both. After a starring role in the well-received “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” (1947) Mayo landed the role of Verna, the scheming, cheating wife of homicidal killer Cody Jarrett (James Cagney) in “White Heat” (1949). Throughout the 1950’s, Mayo’s popularity continued with roles in “The West Point Story” (1950), “Parts in Backfire “(1950), “She’s Working Her Way Through College” (1952),  “South Sea Woman” (1953), “Pearl of the South Pacific” (1955), “The Big Land” (1957), and “Fort Dobbs” (1958) among others. By the start of the 60s, her career had slowed, but she had occasional film appearances in the following decades, her last being in “The Man Next Door” in 1997.

 

Virginia Mayo and James Cagney in “The West Point Story” (1950).

When her Hollywood film career began to wane, Mayo turned to television, appearing in many made for television movies and series such as; “Wagon Train”, “The Loretta Young Show”, “McGarry and His Mouse”, “Rod Serling’s Night Gallery”, “Police Story”, “Santa Barbara”, “Murder, She Wrote”, “Remington Steele”, and “The Love Boat”.

 

Virginia Mayo and husband Michael O´Shea attend a Hollywood show. March, 1954

 

Mayo and her husband, actor Michael O’Shea also co-starred in such stage productions as “Tunnel of Love”, “Fiorello”, and “George Washington Slept Here”. She appeared in her own right as well in stage and musical theater productions.

 

Virginia Mayo and her husband Michael O´Shea with their daughter Mary Catherine 1957

 

Virginia Mayo wed Michael O’Shea in 1947, and remained married to him until he died in 1973. They had one child, Mary Catherine O’Shea, born in 1953.

 

Virginia Mayo

 

Virginia Mayo died at the age of 84 on January 17, 2005 of congestive heart failure in Los Angeles.

 

Virginia Mayo

 

Virginia Mayo has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1751 Vine. In 1996 she received a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

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