Posts Tagged ‘Shirley Temple’

Rochelle Hudson acting career spanned four decades

 

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson, born March 6, 1916 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma was a film and television actress whose career spanned four decades from the 1930s through the 1960s. She was named a WAMPAS Baby Star in 1931 along with future Hollywood stars Joan Blondell, Constance Cummings, Frances Dee, and Anita Louise. Hudson may be best remembered today for costarring in “Wild Boys of the Road” (1933), playing Cosette in “Les Miserables” (1935), as the older sister of Shirley Temple’s character in “Curly Top” (1935), and for playing Natalie Wood’s mother in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955). Other notable roles for Hudson include; Sally Glynn the fallen ingenue in “She Done Him Wrong” (1933) starring Cary Grant and Mae West; Richard Cromwell’s love interest in the Will Rogers showcase “Life Begins at Forty” (1935); “Way Down East” (1935) with Henry Fonda; the daughter of carnival barker W.C. Fields in “Poppy” (1936); and Claudette Colbert’s adult daughter in “Imitation of Life” (1934).

 

Rochelle Hudson

Rochelle Hudson


 

In the 1954–1955 television season, Hudson co-starred with Gil Stratton and Eddie Mayehoff in the CBS situation comedy “That’s My Boy”, based on the 1951 Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin film of the same name. Other television credits include appearing on Racket Squad in 1951, Schlitz Playhouse in 1952, Shower of Stars in 1954, Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre in 1955, and Branded in 1965.

 

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in "Way Down East" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson with Henry Fonda in
“Way Down East” (1935)


 

Hudson was married four times. Her first husband was Charles Brust. Little is known of the marriage other than it ended in divorce. She remarried in 1939 to Harold Thompson, who was the head of the Storyline Department at Disney Studios. She assisted Thompson, who was doing espionage work in Mexico as a civilian during World War II. They posed as a vacationing couple to various parts of Mexico, to detect if there was any German activity in these areas. One of their more successful vacations uncovered a supply of high test aviation gas hidden by German agents in Baja California. After their divorce in 1947, Hudson married a third time the following year to Los Angeles Times sportswriter, Dick Irving Hyland. The marriage lasted two years before the couple divorced. Her final marriage was to Robert Mindell, a hotel executive. The couple remained together for eight years before they divorced in 1971.

 

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in "Imitation of Life" (1934)

Rochelle Hudson and Claudette Colbert in
“Imitation of Life” (1934)


 

On January 17, 1972, Hudson was found dead in her home at the Palm Desert Country Club. A business associate with whom she had been working in real estate discovered her body on her bathroom floor. Hudson had died of a heart attack brought on by a liver ailment. Her only close survivor was her mother.

 

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in "Poppy" (1936)

Rochelle Hudson with W.C. Fields in
“Poppy” (1936)

 

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in "Curly Top" (1935)

Rochelle Hudson and Shirley Temple in
“Curly Top” (1935)

 

Rochelle Hudson - Bathing Beauty -  ca.1940s

Rochelle Hudson

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Shirley Temple — Happy New Year!!

                         Shirley Temple
                       Happy New Year!!

Shirley Temple -- Happy New Year -- 1934

Shirley Temple — Happy New Year — 1934

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Dorothy Dell

 

Dorothy Dell was an ill-fated actress whose star had just begun to rise in the early 1930’s when she died tragically in an automobile accident at the age of nineteen.

 

Dorothy Dell

Dorothy Dell

Dell was born Dorothy Dell Goff to Elbert and Lillan Goff on January 30, 1915 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. When Dell was thirteen months old she won the most beautiful baby in Hattiesburg beauty contest. She moved with her family to New Orleans, Louisiana, at age thirteen, where she attended the Sophie Wright High School for girls. In 1930 at the age of fifteen, Dell won the Miss New Orleans title, beating out seventy-four other contestants, including a pre-fame Dorothy Lamour, who would win the title the following year. The two would become the best of friends. Initially desiring to become a singer, Dell was discovered by composer Wesley Lord, and soon signed a radio contract. Dell received her first major press exposure later the same year when she won the Galveston, Texas International Pageant of Pulchritude with the judges and press declaring her “Miss Universe”. With this positive publicity Dell established a successful vaudeville act. After working on the vaudeville circuit for thirty-two weeks, she moved to New York in 1931. One night, Dell was singing at a benefit when she was heard by Florenz Ziegfeld who arranged for her to appear on Broadway in the Ziegfeld Follies. Dell followed this success with a role in the production of “Tattle Tales” in 1933.

 

Dorothy Dell

Dorothy Dell

 

Dell moved to Hollywood in December 1933 and was signed to a long term contract by Paramount Pictures. Initially contracted for bit parts, Dell won her first film role over such established stars as Mae Clarke and Isabel Jewell, making her Paramount debut in 1934 in “Wharf Angel” with Victor McLaglen. The film was a success and the reviews for Dell were favorable. Paramount began to consider Dell as a potential star and in her next film she had a substantial role in the Shirley Temple film “Little Miss Marker” (1934) which also starred Adolphe Menjou and Charles Bickford. She then starred in “Shoot the Works” (1934) and her rendition of the ballad “With My Eyes Wide Open, I’m Dreaming” in the film became a hit record and led to comparisons with Mae West. With her star on the rise, Paramount scheduled her to reunite with Shirley Temple and opposite Gary Cooper in “Now and Forever” (1934) in what was to have been Dell’s first major starring role as a romantic lead. It was not to be as fate tragically interceded.

 

Dorothy Dell with Shirley Temple in"Little Miss Marker" (1934)

Dorothy Dell with Shirley Temple in”Little Miss Marker” (1934)

 

On June 8, 1934, Dell went on a car ride to Pasadena with 38-year-old Dr. Carl Wagner, because he insisted that she take some time for relaxation between retakes of “Shoot the Works”, and to meet his mother, whom he wanted to show “how sweet a little movie star can be.” After meeting his mother, they went to an all-night party at an inn in Altadena, California. Afterward they were going back to Pasadena when the car left the highway, hit a telephone pole, bounced off a palm tree and hit a boulder. Dell was killed instantly. She was only nineteen years old. Wagner died six hours later in a hospital.

 

Dorothy Dell with Adolphe Menjou in "Little Miss Marker" (1934)

Dorothy Dell with Adolphe Menjou in “Little Miss Marker” (1934)

 

News of Dell’s unexpected death devastated six year old Shirley Temple, causing production of “Now and Forever” (1934) to be temporarily suspended until Shirley could overcome her grief enough to work. Dell’s role in the film was given to Carole Lombard and provided Lombard with one of her earliest significant successes.
Dell’s good friend Dorothy Lamour later credited Dell as the person responsible for the beginning of her own film career.

 

Dorothy Dell

Dorothy Dell

 

According to The Pittsburgh Press news release on June 9, 1934 entitled “Death Dogged Dorothy Dell”, Dell, during her life, had several encounters with near-death experiences. As a child, she narrowly escaped death when being attacked by a dog. The dog was killed by her father to save Dell’s life. In 1931, while at the Follies, she was invited to board a yacht for a party of Harry Richman. She declined, and the girl who took her place, died in an explosion on board. A few weeks later, she was critically injured following a car accident, and she was hospitalized for two months. Furthermore, she fell ill with influenza shortly after and broke a leg during a Follies performance.

 

Dorothy Dell 1934

Dorothy Dell 1934

 

Dorothy Dell was interred in Metairie Cemetery, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

 

Dorothy Dell

Dorothy Dell

 

Dorothy Dell

Dorothy Dell

 

Dorothy Dell with a friend in "Wharf Angel" (1934)

Dorothy Dell with a friend in “Wharf Angel” (1934)

 

Songwriters Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin present Dorothy Dell with the song Down Home which Dell performed in the film "Wharf Angel" (1934)

Songwriters Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin present Dorothy Dell with the song Down Home which Dell performed in the film “Wharf Angel” (1934)

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Anita Louise

 

Anita Louise was an American film and television actress. Louise had delicate features and blonde hair, with an ageless grace which saw her through thirty years before the motion picture cameras, beginning as a child actress before becoming a featured player and leading lady during Hollywood’s Golden Age.

 

Anita Louise

Anita Louise

 

Anita Louise was born Anita Louise Fremault on January 9, 1915 in Manhattan, New York. Using the name Louise Fremault, she made her acting debut on Broadway at the age of six appearing with Walter Hampden in the Broadway production of “Peter Ibbetson” and was soon appearing regularly in Hollywood films. Louise made her first credited screen debut at the age of nine in the film “The Sixth Commandment” (1924). In 1929, Louise dropped her “Fremault” surname, billing herself by her first and second names only, Anita Louise. By her late teens she was being cast in leading and supporting roles in major productions. Among her film successes were “Madame Du Barry” (1934), “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (1935), “The Story of Louis Pasteur” (1936), “Anthony Adverse” (1936), “Marie Antoinette” (1938), “The Sisters” (1938), and “The Little Princess” (1939). Louise complained that her looks often interfered with her chances to obtain serious roles. By the 1940s, she was reduced to mostly secondary roles and her film career started to slow. Some of her films during this time were “Casanova Brown” (1944), “Nine Girls” (1944), “Love Letters” (1945), “The Bandit of Sherwood Forest” (1946), “Blondie’s Big Moment” (1947), and “Bulldog Drummond at Bay” (1947). Her last appearance on the big screen was in the 1952 war film “Retreat, Hell!”.

 

Anita Louise 1931

Anita Louise 1931


 

With the advent of television in the 1950s Louise was provided with further opportunities to continue her acting career. In what was one of her most famous and widely seen roles, Louise was cast as the gentle mother, Nell McLaughlin, in the CBS television series “My Friend Flicka” from 1956–1957, with co-stars Johnny Washbrook, Gene Evans, and Frank Ferguson. Louise was also the substitute host of “The Loretta Young Show” (1953) when Loretta Young was recuperating from surgery. Other shows Anita hosted included “Theater of Time” (1957) and “Spotlight Playhouse” (1958). Her last television appearance was in 1970 in an episode of “The Mod Squad”.

 

Anita Louise and Shirley Temple in "The Little Princess" (1939)

Anita Louise and Shirley Temple in “The Little Princess” (1939)


 

Anita Louise was married twice. The first time was to film producer Buddy Adler in 1940. The couple had two children and remained married until his death in 1960.
In 1962, Louise married Henry Berger and they were together until her death in 1970.

 

Anita Louise with her poodle - 1946

Anita Louise with her poodle – 1946

 

Anita Louise died of a stroke on April 25, 1970, aged 55, in West Los Angeles, California. Louise was interred next to her first husband Buddy Adler at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.

 

Anita Louise and Olivia de Havilland (1937)

Anita Louise and Olivia de Havilland (1937)

 

Anita Louise has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in recognition of her contribution to Motion Pictures at 6801 Hollywood Boulevard.

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Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

“You Were Never Lovelier” (1942 – Columbia Pictures) is a musical comedy starring Fred Astaire, Rita Hayworth, Adolphe Menjou and Xavier Cugat, with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The film was directed by William A. Seiter.  “You Were Never Lovelier” was the second of Astaire’s outings with Hayworth, the first being “You’ll Never Get Rich” (1941), both of which were very successful.

 

Director William A. Seiter with Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Director William A. Seiter with Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire enjoy a smoke break on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire enjoy a smoke break on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Shirley Temple visits Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Shirley Temple visits Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Shirley Temple dances with Fred Astaire while Rita Hayworth watches on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Shirley Temple dances with Fred Astaire while Rita Hayworth watches on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942)

Rita Hayworth and Fred Astaire rehearsing on the set of “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

 

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